Wednesday, November 23, 2011

Transition


Late November is a time of transition in the woods and streams. It also affects us. Darkness comes sooner, we attempt to slow our pace, spend more time together, and prepare for what about to come next.
This is a time when the woods take on what seems to be a time of only one color. That all trees look to be the same, long and short poles of gray. There are no flowers, or green patches of grass along the way. On some days even the sky takes on a gray color blending in with the November earth.
The streams as well as their inhabitants show change. The cold waters full of oxygen seem to be so clear as if you were gazing through air. The trout have for the most part finished their spawning. They have grown thin and must try to gain some weight, before winter tests them. Gone are the brisk splashy rises to a dry fly, and here are the subsurface strikes to a streamer, or the subtle bump of a trout taking a beadhead Pheasant Tail.
Take the time to walk the woods and perhaps a small stream....transition is beautiful.




There is some color, we just have to look.


As I walked this stream,this late November a Woodcock flushed, but did not land....perhaps as if to say goodbye.


13 comments:

  1. Brk- beautiful pics yet again. I also enjoy the transition. Photos just cant seem to capture all the colors right. Its something we anglers must get out and see for ourselves.

    All My Best
    Johnny Utah

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  2. Very nice pictures once again ! This time of year has a beauty all it's on, a black and white beauty that reminds you of an Ansel Adams photograph

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  3. Thanks Professor for another lesson for the note book.

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  4. Beautiful job Brk Trt! I love the time from the first blossoms in the spring till the last leaf falls in Oct with all it's abundance of life but this is also a special time of year. Without the leaves to obstruct the view, many other details and changes in the "book of Nature" are revealed. For example the squirrel dreys and antler rubs are plain as day now. Every time of year has something to offer, we only need to look.

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  5. Johnny Utah,
    Thanks.
    Time spent outdoors is a natural tonic.

    Mark,
    Thanks.
    Ansel Adams was a master at bringing the best out of his photos.

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  6. Ed,
    Thanks.
    Your going to be tested buddy.

    Phillip,
    Thanks.

    Kiwi,
    Thanks.
    The Book of Nature is an easy read, all we have to do stop and open the cover.

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  7. When you live in an area where there is only a small amount of trees without leaves (most are fir, pine, and cedar), you tend to think of those without leaves as sparse and desolate. Winter hits home in a big way (before the snow, that is) when you see the Aspens in the highest of altitudes without leaves. Then in spring, everything springs back greener than ever. A rebirth, if you will, and a very nice one.

    Mark

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  8. "Long and short poles of grey," beautiful. Looks like a jailhouse for Ruffed Grouse. I wonder if you've collected any feathers along your journey to small places..

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  9. Shoreman,
    Thanks.
    Each season has its good points, and if we don't like something about it, oh well there's another one coming soon.

    Ed,
    I don't believe that.

    Gary Thompson,
    Thanks.
    A jailhouse for ole ruffy....nice.
    Yes Gary, many feathers.

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  10. Happy Thanksgiving Alan to you and all your family. Our blessings overflow, do they not? And THANK YOU for all your wonderful posts. Peace, Mike

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  11. penbayman,
    Thanks.
    We do have a lot to be thankful for.
    Mike to you and yours Happy Thanksgiving.
    Stay warm friend.

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