Thursday, May 24, 2012

After a Spring Rain


Yesterday was one of those classic late spring days. It had rained the day before so the morning broke with a half sun, with clouds and fog in the mix. The air seemed a bit muggy and the threat for a shower or two did not alter my plan of fishing this little stream.

As I started my walk along the stream the sun was making starting to filter through the trees. It was to be a peek-a-boo type of day with the clouds. The stream is well shaded and the water seemed cool to the touch. But at this time of year I like to check the temps just to be sure. So I dropped in the thermometer in and it read 60 degrees.

While I observed no rises, not that there weren't any, I tied on a wet fly. the Red Pin. I fished the fly in the riffles leading to deeper water with undercuts. Soon there was a strike and a brookie was at hand.
These types of places on small streams always hold a fish or two. The only drawback is that one hookup will cause such a ruckus that it's best to leave and rest the spot.


The woods after a rain are wonderful. The smells are intoxicating, and the leaves are so vibrant, and very wet. This makes for some damp t-shirts and jeans.

This one spot I drifted the fly into with the hopes of working it alongside the undercut bank. As the fly reached the tip of the log a flash came from the undercut and this brook trout took the fly. It all happened within a heartbeat.


"Brook Trout" faster than a speeding bullet, able to strike a Red Pin, and give the holder more pleasure then can be measured.


An Orvis Superfine fly rod. It's a 6ft 4wt full flex, coupled with an English made Battenkill reel. It's a great small stream rod and reel. I purchased this combo about 6 years ago and have only fished at perhaps a dozen times. There is a reason, and I questioned it in a email to Orvis. The rest of the story will follow in a later post.

CLICK IMAGES TO ENLARGE








22 comments:

  1. I like the super fine full flex. I have a slow action 4 wt to use in the rivers. one day i will buy a super fine 3 wt. Beautiful pics!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Savage,
      Thanks.
      They're wonderful rods.

      Delete
  2. "Brook Trout" faster than a speeding bullet, able to strike a Red Pin, and give the holder more pleasure then can be measured.".....Amen to that! Sometimes I get the biggest kick out of seeing the flash as one is about to strike the fly. Great post.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Kiwi,
      Thanks.
      At times it happens so fast, I wonder how they're able to take the fly.

      Delete
  3. Faster than a speeding bullet, glad those brookies like to play along.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Sanders,
      Thanks.
      They're a great bunch of guys, almost always willing to cooperate.

      Delete
  4. I love my 6 ft 3 wt and i my staple rod for "small streams"

    wonderful photos as always, the greens are so deep

    interested to see your follow up to the rod

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Blake Hamilton,
      Thanks.
      It's a great time of year to be outdoors...especially with a small stream rod in hand.

      Delete
  5. Hey Alan.....as usual I have a couple of questions: how far will a trout travel to hit a fly?

    Also, if you catch a trout in a particular area, then do you always have to give that place a rest? Or do you switch what type of fly you are using?

    As always, I appreciate any information you provide and nice pictures as usual.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Ed,
      Thanks.
      Most times you are able to catch two from a holding or feeding spot. Sometimes the tussle created will put others in hiding for a spell. A fly change does work at times too. But I like resting the spot for a half hour or so.

      Delete
  6. Always amazes me what come out of such a little "crick".

    Mark

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Shoreman,
      Thanks.
      It's a sad comment in a way. But that's where we have pushed the wild brook trout to. Small back-in headwater streams. I love seeking them though.

      Delete
  7. Brk
    Is the Orvis reel you are using a small arbor. I use a 7 1/2 ft. 3 wt with a 3 1/8 dia. Redington reel which is super light along with rod. When I was looking for a reel for my 3 wt I checked numerous places and found that the Redginton was the lightest of any I found. The 6 ft. and the orvis reel would be perfect for those streams. Thanks for sharing

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Bill Trussell,
      Thanks.
      Yes it is. It's a light reel and balances well.

      Delete
  8. I especially like fishing after a rain. The slightly off color water makes the fish a bit less selective.

    I have one of the Orvis Trout Bum rods. I have to remind myself to slow down the casting stroke when I fish it. Quite a gem.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Steve Zakur,
      Thanks.
      Those rods do have a special feeling. They designed them well.

      Delete
  9. Nice and green down your way and it's finally doing the same here Brk Trt..and something else that is green (with envy) is me seeing all the photos of your marvelous Brookies!!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. penbayman,
      Thanks.
      The north country is finally there.
      The brookies are probably working the surface now.

      Delete
  10. As always, your photos and anecdotes are inspirational. I can't wait to retire and roam around looking for small wild trout streams even more than I do now.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. RKM,
      Thanks.
      It's a wonderful feeling my friend.

      Delete
  11. quite eager for your blog post on the Orvis rod

    ReplyDelete