Thursday, May 3, 2012

Small Waters...."Kinda"






Some folks, those that don't fish and perhaps those who seek larger fish often say why do you fish for those wee guys. Most of the time I respond it's enjoyable for me. This is a quick answer and one that will usually suffice. But there is more to it than that and here are a few more reasons I seek these wild ones on small waters.

The streams they call home are reason enough to seek them. The wonder of a trout living his whole life in such places. The scant offerings of food, the vigilance needed to stay alive, and the thought of spending ones life in a few hundred yards of stream is truly remarkable.

There is a challenge sneaking up on these fish and presenting your offering to them. On this day I was able to see brookies rising in various places along the stream. Some of the rise forms were subtle and some were very splashy.Trying to determine what was being dined on is imposable at least for me. So you fish a variety of flies until you find the "Kinda Fly". That's the one that works.


In this pool I observed little rise forms, dimples. The trout were taking small emergers. I tossed what I though to be close enough, and was rewarded with a beautiful brookie.


This was not the midge they were feeding on, but is was Kinda like it.


This pool was quiet as far as rises go but it looked so promising. And when the fly came between the rock and the log the pool erupted in a very splashy rise and take.

In a few moments I was pleased to hold this wonder.

Why do I fish these small waters...... I "Kinda" like it.









34 comments:

  1. Brk
    The colors on these trout are astounding. What length, wt rod and tippet size are you using? What is the largest brook trout you have landed from these streams. Great post as always!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Bill Trussell,
      Thanks.
      I usually use a 6ft 2wt rod. But I have a fondness for a 7ft 5wt Orvis Small Stream Special.
      I almost always use 6x tippet.

      Delete
    2. Bill,
      The largest brookie has been about 10 inches. There are bigger I suspect but that would require high water or fishing at dark or after to bring one to hand.

      Delete
  2. Waiting for the Consumnes to look like that, then it's rock & roll time.

    Mark

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Shoreman,
      Thanks.
      I hope rock & roll time is soon.

      Delete
  3. I think people get excited by big, missing the point that big is relative, and that there is more to fishing than catching regardless. Catching a native brookie, in a small stream - often a stream most dont believe fish could live in - is an amazing experience.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Will,
      Thanks.
      For those who have never experienced small stream angling they are missing so much. Every one should give it a try.

      Delete
  4. The pictures of the fish and their homes are fantastic. Thanks for sharing.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Savage,
      Thanks.
      They are a joy to view.

      Delete
  5. I can see why you like the wee streams Alan, there's something special about working your way up a burn, every pool is a mystery waiting to be discovered, and with lovely brookies like that to be found who wouldn't be happy!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. brian,
      Thanks.
      A wonderful mystery for sure. And when that pool or run gives up a wild one it's so rewarding.

      Delete
  6. A well done effort at capturing the essence of your passion for small streams. Set my mind to wondering and remembering long lost places and times.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Brad Williamson,
      Thanks.
      I'm glad you were able to extract that feeling.

      Delete
  7. If I were told I would have to pick one and only one kind of fish and type of water to fish on for the rest of my life without a doubt or a moment of hesitation it would be small brook trout and small woodland streams. The only regret with that choice is, at the moment, I don't live close enough to those kinds of places. Excellent post Alan!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Kiwi,
      Thanks.
      I'm with you on that. I know L.I. is not the hot bed of this type of angling, but perhaps a trip could be in your future. If not visit here, I'll try to keep fishing for brookies.

      Delete
  8. I "kinda" know where you are coming from :) I am beckoned by the small waters each and every day. Great post and excellent looking gems from some beauty water. Tight LInes.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Trout MaGee,
      Thanks.
      From your blog I gather you are a fan of small streams.
      Your posts are always top notch.

      Delete
  9. I fully agree with your philosophy when it comes to fly fishing. I fish the way I do because that's the way I like it. It's a time to enjoy all the wonders of nature especially of those swimming in our streams or still waters. It can't be measured in kilograms or pounds. It's something that gives more than that. Kind of hard to explain to those that doesn't get it. I would dare to say that it's measured in satisfaction of a well spent time.
    Have fun hunting hungry brook trout,
    Mats Olsson

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The Jassid Man,
      Thanks.
      You have stated it very well my friend.

      Delete
  10. "Because it's enjoyable to me"...that's reason enough, but I suppose the other reasons are just icing on the cake.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Sanders,
      Thanks.
      For sure, for sure.

      Delete
  11. Hi Alan......it is amazing where these fish live.

    As for small versus big..............I can't decide so I try to fish them all. They all have something to behold and are special (corny but true in my view).

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Ed,
      Thanks.
      They do live in beautiful places. And if it gives you enjoyment, by all means fish for it.

      Delete
    2. When to Red Brook today and tried the Mickey Finn......got a hit but I had a "long release".

      Also.....any thoughts again about putting that gathering together? I know last year didn't work out but there seems to be small group in the "area" that might want to get together.

      Delete
    3. Ed,
      Not at this time. TU has a family day at Red Brook. It's usually on a weekend in the month of September. If your interested contact Mass-RI chapter of TU.

      Delete
  12. In the grand scheme of it all those "little" brookies are as big as the day is long, one look at their color palette and its easy to become lost in their vastness.

    ReplyDelete
  13. Beautiful brookies Alan...I was happy to get thru this entry without seeing any food pics as I am hungry at the moment and any of your delicious culinary images would have put me over the edge :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Steve,
      Thanks.
      Well that may be the case here, but wait til you read the next one.

      Delete
  14. And you "Kinda" do it very well...

    ReplyDelete
  15. Some years ago I read a quote that spoke to me, while I don't remember the exact words please allow me to paraphrase it. It went something like this: "For a true fisherman it isn't how big the fish must be to satisfy the fisherman, it is how small the fish can be and still satisfy the fisherman".
    Those words resonated within me as I do so enjoy a light rod and a small stream. It is my small piece of heaven.

    Tim

    ReplyDelete