Tuesday, May 8, 2012

Two Streams, the First




This is the first part of a two part post on two wild brook trout streams. These streams are about six miles apart and flow through a pine, hemlock and hardwood forest. The streams have almost the same type of structure consisting of plunge pools, large boulders, small rocks and runs and riffles. The insect life is about the same for these small streams caddis, mayflies, but the hatches are not as prolific as some of the larger rivers in Connecticut, and lots of land based insects.

I selected my number one fly for small streams a Bomber in an attempt to bring a brookie to the surface. Fishing the likely holding places I sent the Bomber prospecting. It wasn't long before the fly worked its stuff. A splashly rise and a miss. This same thing happened many times that day, but it also produced several hookups.

One of the solutions to cutting down on the short strikes was to use a wet fly, a Picket Pin. They seemed to readily take the fly and the hookups were better.


This is the difference in brook trout in the two streams. The brookies in this stream are very dark, some almost black. They say that a brook trout takes on the colors of the stained waters they live in. This stream was tea colored. This fellow liked the Picket Pin.


I love these pools. They always hold a trout or two, and they are just beautiful to look at.


These are a few more of the dark colored brookies the live in this stream.


Here's one that I managed to take the Bomber.


If I fished this stream all day and never caught a fish it would be a successful day.









23 comments:

  1. Great post , i think i'm going to have to give those bombers a try this summer.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Beautiful stream pictures, beautiful brookie pictures...what more could you ask for? Thanks for the post.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Kiwi,
      Thanks.
      Not much more I guess.

      Delete
  3. Love the colors of these specs Alan. So dark, and beautiful looking fish. Looks like fun water to follow.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Darren MacEachern,
      Thanks.
      This stream produces some awfully dark brookies.

      Delete
  4. Brk
    You made an interesting comment about the wet fly and short hits. I just learn something here. I will have to give that suggestion a try when I am getting short hits on the tailrace. The brookie has to be most colorful trout of all in the trout family. Thanks for sharing a great post.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Bill Trussell,
      Thanks.
      Sometimes changing to an underwater offering gives you an edge. No argument from me as to the beauty of the brook trout.

      Delete
  5. That has to be one of the most beautiful small streams I've ever seen. The fact that it contains such pretty little wild brook trout makes it all the better...you're a lucky guy!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. HighPlainsFlyFisher,
      Thanks.
      It's a special place for sure. And I'm very fortunate to have such places to fish.

      Delete
  6. Hey Professor..........honest question here: what exactly is a short hit?

    Great pictures and info as usual.

    Thanks.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Ed,
      Thanks.
      When I'm fishing dry flies the rises show an interest in feeding. There are times when a rise occurs and no hookup takes place, and this happens often I believe the trout are reluctant to feed on the surface. By changing to a wet fly which is subsurface makes the trout feel safe in not being detected and will take the fly with gusto and your hookup rate improves.
      My two cents.

      Delete
    2. Thanks Alan. I appreciate the information.

      Delete
  7. Gorgeous stuff. I miss those eastern hardwoods and streams.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Jim Yaussy Albright,
      Thanks.
      They sure can be beautiful this time of year.

      Delete
  8. I have to agree with your last sentence. Couldn't have said it better.

    Mark

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Shoreman,
      Thanks.
      It sort of sums it up. Short and sweet.

      Delete
  9. Stumbled upon your blog. Fantastic, will be checking it regularly. Great fish.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Atlas,
      Thanks.
      Welcome
      I'm glad you found us, and I hope you'll comment often.

      Delete
  10. Great post. Really enjoy seeing the places that you fish. Small, beautiful, and full of fish. Seems about perfect.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Sanders,
      Thanks.
      They are truly little pieces of heaven.

      Delete
  11. The trees are leafing out beautifully in CT..you must be about a month ahead of us..those tea trout are beauties..and I gotta check out the Picket Pin..nice post Brk Trt..

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. penbayman,
      Thanks.
      Tea trout describes them well.
      Try the Picket Pin.

      Delete