Thursday, July 5, 2012

Small Stream Pleasure, in a Large River





As summer takes hold in Connecticut with temperatures in the nineties and little rainfall except for a stray thundershower, I have pretty much left the small streams be. Choosing to fish a larger and cooler river I have enjoyed the ability to take much larger trout. These trout are stocked and holdover fish that have grown big on the abundant food found in the river. In recent years there have been catches of wild browns in this river. Documented tales of spawning trout. In years past I have fished this river in the fall. In those areas where small tribs have entered I have taken some wild brookies, most of which have been small. The last two years have brought a few 12 inch brook trout to hand. Somethings happening here, and it's all good.

Monday late afternoon and evening I visited this river, choosing to fish its upper most reaches. The sun was hot when I entered the water. As I dropped the thermometer into the stream to find out what I suspected. The temp read 56 degrees. The air temp was around 90, but a foot above the water I'll bet was 60. The first half hour produced nothing. I worked a good piece of water before moving down stream. While fishing a fast run I got my first rise, hookup, and LDR.

This was going to be one of those outings that I write about in my journal.
As the sun started to set it produced shadows on the stream. Within the shadows were these pockets of flowing water near the sides of the river. As I cast the Bomber into these pockets I was to given the chance to catch wild beauty that is generally found in the small streams I fish.

"Bombers" they will catch fish where ever they're fished.


This is of natural making. It's dark green back was beautiful. It battled with such tenacity. And a second after this photo was taken he was in the water leaving the Bomber in my finger. Several of these were taken this evening.


As I fished I noticed a shadow moving in the woods along the far side. Another angler was ruled out because the woods would have been difficult to navigate. As I watched, trying to see what was moving I still could not determine what it was. It was starting to get dark and I was going to leave shortly, perhaps because of unknown movement in the woods, but I choose to stay a while longer.


The decision to stay was a good one for I was rewarded with this wild handsome brown. His red highlights as he lay in the water were gorgeous. He took the Bomber along side of a fallen tree. I hope I have the chance to see what this brown looks like in a few years.


A little celebration for this outing. To wild trout in The Farmington.


CLICK IMAGES TO ENLARGE












21 comments:

  1. Replies
    1. TROUT1,
      Thanks.
      I appreciate the comment.

      Delete
  2. Looks like a great outing! It does get a little spooky once the lights go out...

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Steve,
      Thanks.
      Spooky, that's for sure. The figure sneaking through the wood was a deer....I hope.

      Delete
    2. LOL - one of the areas I have been hitting at night has a path along the water I need to walk to get out...shoulder height weeds on one side, river on the other...just eerie!

      Delete
  3. Replies
    1. Mark,
      Thanks.
      I know you have taken a few brookies in the Farmy this year.

      Delete
  4. Nice going my friend!
    I'm planning my first ever Farmington trip for some Sunday this summer. Hoping you & Pete can show me around.
    I also came up with a name for your future book: "Brookies & Bombers - Reflections Of A Small Stream Fly Fisherman"
    It's yours, free of charge. :)
    I'll be in touch about a Farmy trip.
    A.T.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Apache Trout,
      Thanks.
      John,
      I would love to team up with you some Sunday, and I'm sure if Pete's available he'll join in.
      That title is A-OK. I just may take you up on the offer.

      Delete
  5. Standing in 55 degree water sounds like a great way to cool off on a hot summer day. The little brown will grow up to be a little more than a hand full i am sure.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Savage,
      Thanks.
      Late afternoon and 90, I dipped my hat in the water and placed on my head. Instant drop in body temp....refreshing. I'm sure hoping on that brown.

      Delete
  6. That last little brown. Gorgeous. Your hand, the water running over it all. Beauty.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. e.m.b.,
      Thanks.
      Jeanette and I both agree that was one of the best photos I've ever taken. And now you agree.

      Delete
  7. If I had to guess, that shadow in the woods was probably Mike's (Troutrageous!) Tenkara Sasquatch just waiting for you to leave. The color on that brown was superb.

    Mark

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Mark Kautz,
      Thanks.
      Mike's Sasquatch, I could believe that.

      Delete
  8. Brk
    First off was the meal stream side? Those bombers are killer looking flies, I think you have said you tie those yourself. I really like the looks of the fly reel you are using. What is the make and is it spooled with 3/4 wt line? As always the brook trout you land are amazing!! Thanks for sharing a great post

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Bill Trussell,
      Thanks.
      It was in my car which was along the stream. I tie the Bombers, and I'll bet they would work well where you fish. The reel is an Orvis LA Trout. It's spooled with a 3wt.

      Delete
  9. Nice report Alan. You made me itchy to try some larger water. When you have a truly beautiful fish, it doesn't matter what size it is.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Howard Levett,
      Thanks.
      Large waters are a welcome change. It's true about the beauty of trout.

      Delete