Sunday, August 12, 2012

"Old Timer"

A folding piece of steel that has been with me since I started carrying my Cortland glass rod. It has done some fine work in the years since I purchased it in a general store in Vermont. It has dressed many pheasants and woodcock from woodlands and fields of New England, and the occasional trout for a stream side breakfast. Countless potatoes have been sliced and diced, and many a slab of bacon. It was there to cut apples and fine cheddar. It's opened many a package, sharpened a few pencils, and made those clean willow sticks for toasting marshmallows over an open fire. In those days where I would sleep overnight in my truck in the woods along a stream to be able to fish at first light it gave me comfort from those strange sounds one hears.

It's an "Old Timer" and like many old timers there's many more stories to be told.


CLICK IMAGES TO ENLARGE


24 comments:

  1. Old Timer knives have stood the test of time. Exceptional knives I must say.

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    Replies
    1. Samuel Stone,
      Thanks.
      They are that for sure.

      Delete
  2. As a grandson who, at nine years old, was taught to use a forge and how to make a pair of scissors by his cutler grandad, who was one of Sheffield's many "little mesters", I can see that the blade of your knife is of carbon steel and as such will take and hold a finer edge than many of its modern counterparts with blades of stainless steel. Looked after and kept sharp (with a steel for preference) it is not really just your knife, it's an heirloom for you to pass on...

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    Replies
    1. Regular Rod,
      Thanks.
      It is of carbon steel, and to keep it fine tuned I put it to the steel on a daily basis.

      Delete
  3. It's amazing really , just reading your post and looking at the picture of the knife I can visualize the many streamside lunches it's been party to.
    I've got a set exactly like that , a medium size and a smaller version of the same knife. My grandfather gave them both to me when I was probably what would be considered "too young" to have knives in todays world. They have sat on my fly tying desk for awhile now , I quit carrying the larger one every day for fear of losing it but after reading this I think I'm going to have to get that knife some fresh air the next time I make a trip to the river.

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    Replies
    1. HighPlainsFlyFisher,
      Thanks.
      Loosing the knife has always been in the back of my mind also, but I've been fortunate for not having done it.

      Delete
  4. Great Story behind the knife! It feels good when you know you got your moneys worth. Great post!

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    Replies
    1. Savage,
      Thanks.
      When this knife was made we still had a few companies who produced a quality long lasting product.

      Delete
  5. Alan
    I never leave home without my little Old Timer knife in my front bluejean pocket. I use to carry the larger one but it got to be a little heavy so I switched to my smaller knife some years ago. This is an exceptional pocket knife for the money. Thanks for sharing

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    Replies
    1. Bill Trussell,
      Thanks.
      They do come in handy at times.

      Delete
  6. I never have figured out how anyone gets through the day without a good little knife in their pocket. I've got an Old Timer of my own, but my prize never leaves the house anymore as I keep my Dads old pocket knife in my wifes Jewelry Box. If those old blades could just talk!

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    Replies
    1. Midgeman,
      Thanks.
      You and me both. Keeping it safe for someone else to cherish is a good idea.

      Delete
  7. Well, mine's an old Case, but I feel the same way as everyone else. Wouldn't leave home without it...and a .38 for those scary noises in the dark.

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    1. Howard Levett,
      Thanks.
      A .38 is a fine choice.

      Delete
  8. What I wouldn't give to spend a day along the stream in your headliner sitting at that very pool whittling away both day and stob. Thank you for reminding me of the simpler things, time to get outside and enjoy our cooler weather.

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    Replies
    1. Bill,
      Thanks.
      It's those simpler things we all crave. but some never realize it.

      Delete
  9. Brk Trt,
    That knife, what a great companion and a perfect friend. Always there when you need it, loyal, not to chatty, and knows how to keep a secret.
    I have a boker pocket knife that was a gift from a good friend, and its my most loyalist companion.

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    Replies
    1. DRYFLYGUY,
      Thanks.
      I love your description.

      Delete
  10. I'd have to echo HighPlainsFlyFisher's comment. That knife just looks cool and like it could be a source for a lot of stories.

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    Replies
    1. Kevin Frank,
      Thanks.
      It's like a folding journal.

      Delete
  11. I very fondly remember my first Old Timer. I sat under a tree and whittled away sticks for the entire afternoon. It was my Birthday. My 10th year, I think if my memory holds.

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    Replies
    1. e.m.b.,
      Thanks.
      Whittling, our imaginations were at there peaks then.

      Delete