Monday, August 20, 2012

Small Waters and Brook Trout..plus.

The rains over the last day or so helped to bring the levels up, plus the cool 57 degree night all contributed too a fine few hours on a small brook. The forecast this week is for cooler temps both day and night, something we are all happy about.

As I walked the dirt path leading to a starting point where my fishing begins I noticed these flowers. They were clustered in groups around the water and path. My impression was that of stars forming a navigation line for me to follow. I walked to the streams edge and put my hand into the water, it felt so cool. I then reached for the thermometer and dropped it in and allowed it to set on the bottom for a few moments. Lifting it out I read the temp as 60 degrees, wonderful. I monitored the temp as I fished and it was to remain constant along the brook.


I had tied on an Elk Hair Caddis, from a previous outing and so that was the first fly fished today. I cast it into a likely run and soon a willing combatant took hold. The 2wt did its job but I didn't and the brookie became a quick memory. Moving to another dark riffle with a submerged log, I floated the caddis right along side of it and Bam, the little guy took the fly. He was beautiful to hold for second or two, it's something I can't describe fully, and I never tire of.


A typical brook trout holding place in these small streams. Riffled water bringing both food and oxygen rich water, dark undercuts and submerged structure, with deeper water close by.


Wild beauty along the stream. I've seen these now in two colors and they're beautiful.


Today was a day when not only did the brookie take the fly, but the brown. I have fished this stream for many years and until a few years ago have only taken brookies. Now the wild brown is here. I usually take one or two a year in various sizes, but I've accomplished this early this year. Well today I caught my third one of this year. He was taken in a thin rapidly moving piece of water with a nice undercut. By far the most colorful brown to date. His red spots jumped at you. I noticed the fish was hooked in the fin and he was released without a photo.


Being able to have the good fortune of holding one of these wild ones will bring me back another day.



18 comments:

  1. Despite the fact that the streams of this size is hard to catch big trout, I also really like to venture on such a small river. For the sake of their great charm! Best wishes!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Tomek O,
      Thanks.
      They sure do have that. I for one will give up the big ones for that charm.

      Delete
  2. Lovely stream for dry fly fishing! Sad to say there aren't any close to where I live now but I guess I'll have to travel a bit to fish my old ones.

    Have fun fly fishing and enjoying the lovely nature,
    Mats Olsson

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The Jassid Man,
      Thanks.
      I think it would be worth the road trip.

      Delete
  3. It's nice to see the wild ones responding to the cooler weather in stride.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Sanders,
      Thanks.
      Cool, a hell of a trigger.

      Delete
  4. Thank goodness for the relief from the heat. The Brookies are back on the menu (figuratively speaking).

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Steve Zakur,
      Thanks.
      That relief is welcomed by us all.

      Delete
  5. Alan
    You are not only an accomplished fly angler, but you are an excellent photographer. Do you fish dries most of time for the brooks? What length 2 wt were you using? Great Post!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Bill Trussell,
      Thanks.
      I appreciate those comments. I start with a dry always, any time of year. Then I'll fish wets, and streamers as the situation permits.
      It's a 6ft, 2wt.

      Delete
  6. the streams and cooler temps sound so inviting. :)

    ReplyDelete
  7. Hard for me to tell..same fly for both trout pictured? Nice work there, my man..

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. penbayman,
      Thanks.
      Yes it is, EH Caddis.

      Delete
  8. TexWisGirl,
    Thanks.
    They are welcomed after that heat wave.

    ReplyDelete
  9. I've just started exploring CT water since moving here two weeks ago. I love your pics. The fungus pictured is probably Clavaria zollingeri, in the family known collectively as coral fungus. None are particularly choice to collect.

    ReplyDelete
  10. 8fung.us,
    Thanks.
    Welcome to CT. There's lots of wonderful streams here, and some even have wild trout.
    Thanks for the heads up on the fungi.

    ReplyDelete