Thursday, October 25, 2012

Heirlooms

Heirlooms, I'm sure we all have some. In this case I'm speaking to those related to fly fishing. There can be a variety of them that can have very impressive monetary values, especially cane rods and some of those beautiful classic reels. There are old fly boxes such as a vintage Wheatley, landing nets, and fly collections left by family members who walked in the streams years ago.

I have a few I plan to leave although they might not carry a heavy price tag they are some of the quality items I have enjoyed and will be in the family long after.

Books. The printed physical type. I have many which will be both a joy to read as well as informative. Just a note. While the publishing of printed physical books has softened over the last few years, the sales of bookcases has increased.


This is the one item that I consider to be an heirloom that's unique. Journals can be passed down to family members showing the wonderful times spent on the rivers and streams. You can give an account of those beautiful fish, and tell of the fly that managed the persuade him to make that mistake. While journals will never carry the monetary of a Leonard bamboo rod, there value to the families of the angler are priceless.

CLICK IMAGES TO ENLARGE


18 comments:

  1. I have kept several journals for a number of years now and they include subjects like fishing but also Nature observations, kayaking and hiking trips. I do hope to pass some of them onto my kids some day (esp. the Nature journal). I think that they are not only great sources of info but they provide a very interesting window into what was going on at any particular point in your life. Nice post.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Kiwi,
      Thanks.
      Those types of journals are also quite nice. What happens today may never be duplicated.

      Delete
  2. I noticed the copy of On the Spine of Time by Harry Middleton, probably the best outdoor writer most people have never heard of.

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    Replies
    1. tenkara ambassador,
      Thanks.
      Harry Middleton, a very honest and down to earth writer.

      Delete
  3. I truly believe that anything passed down, regardless of monetary value, will always be cherished by those who receive such a gift. These gifts carry such a greater value...nice post Alan.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Steve,
      Thanks.
      They're our stories, told by us, at the time it happens.

      Delete
  4. Few things with a "heavy price tag" can outweigh the value of heirlooms such as these. A fine post!

    ReplyDelete
  5. Long after any inheritance is spent and said purchase/s is/are forgotten family heirlooms will bring everlasting memories.

    Thanks for the reminder Alan.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Ed,
      Thanks.
      The same feelings for me.

      Delete
  6. As I've mentioned a time or two (somewhere)I'm a collector of things. Many are valuable to only me, a few have a small monetary value. The most treasured are the one's that spark memories of times past. Thanks for the nice post Alan.

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    Replies
    1. howard Levett,
      Thanks.
      Well said my friend.

      Delete
  7. Some day my son will inherit all the books and other fishing paraphernalia I have, just not very soon, I hope.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Mark Kautz,
      Thanks.
      Us geezers still have a lot to do before checking out.

      Delete
  8. Wonderful to see a copy of On the Spine of Time. I agree Harry Middleton's work was wonderful. The Earth is Enough is also a wonderful read. True heirlooms
    .
    Trout Buddha
    www.zentrout.com

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Trout Buddha,
      Thanks.
      I'll have to check out that second title.

      Delete
  9. fishermanrichard,
    Thanks.
    I guess it is.

    ReplyDelete