Wednesday, October 3, 2012

Maine 2012, Part Two

In this photo is a lake that can be seen through the trees. This lake has several streams flowing into it that enable the lake dwelling brook trout to spawn. Many of the streams have permanent residents that will live out their lives in the stream but many that return to the lake to grow large feeding on the smelt that live in the lake.

This one tributary starts high above the lake in the mountains. It's several miles long and is quite thick and brushy in areas. I have fished a good portion of the stream over the years.

On this morning I decided to fish an area that is close to where the stream accesses the lake. It's about a half mile or so from the lake. There were several good holding pools along this stretch and I was going to try them. The choice of flies would be streamers, and the choice would be narrowed down to two patterns the Gray Ghost and the Black Ghost.


I tie streamers as many of you who read this blog know. So I was well prepared with a streamer box full of flies ready for action. The only problem was that they were on my desk back in Connecticut. I had forgot to pack them. I had one or two in my wet fly box but I found it necessary to purchase a few locally.


Of the two patterns the Black Ghost was the streamer they hit with gusto. Most of the brook trout were taken on this pattern.

In this run leading to a deep pool I cast the streamer. As the fly drifted to just beyond the fallen log towards the stone. The fly ended its drift. As it lay there in the current for a second or two a brook trout came up an took the fly. A battle took place with the trout heading for the bottom, he stood his ground and it felt has if I had hooked a large log. I knew this was a large fish. Several minutes passed and the pressure was taking its toll on the trout. I retrieved my net has the fish came to the surface. My first glance at him was breath taking. The thing I remember most was the deep orange of his belly. He flipped and made another run for the deep hole which was his lie. I brought him back towards me and as I slid the net into the water I realized I'm going to need a bigger net. Well I managed to get him in, he was folded like a pretzel. I lay the net in the water and he rested there as I reached for my camera. As I brought the camera the trout just turned in the net and swam off. The streamer had come loose and that was it. I estimate the brook trout weighed about four pounds. I do not have a photo of him, but that memory is etched in my mind.

A brook trout in spawning colors. Incomparable beauty.




The drive is almost as beautiful as the brook trout.


Clam "chowdah" served to us in the beautiful Rangeley Inn. Elegance in the Maine woods.

Part 3 to come.


CLICK IMAGES TO ENLARGE




36 comments:

  1. Outstanding photos and report. Love the Black Ghost.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. TROUT1,
      Thanks.
      Those brookies sure did.

      Delete
  2. great fly, hope to see that four pounder in part 3

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Blake,
      Thanks.
      That streamer produced a lot of fish. I wish I could show him to you, unfortunately he swam off without allowing that to happen.

      Delete
  3. Welldone Alan, a pity your prizew was a bit camera shy, i would loved to have seen it!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Col,
      Thanks.
      He was shy, and also pissed off. Perhaps I'll have another chance.

      Delete
  4. Gorgeousness! The stream, the trout, the chowder! The Rangeley Inn -- I've been reading a lot about that part of the country recently. Doing some research on Carrie Stevens. I'm very much looking forward to part 3!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. e.m.b.,
      Thanks.
      A beautiful area indeed.
      The history in the region is awesome. A book I suggest is Carrie Stevens, by Graydon Hilyard.

      Delete
  5. Beautiful pictures of the land and fish. Looks like the fall color in both are at their prime! Thanks for sharing them with the rest of us !

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Mark,
      Thanks.
      Beautiful views in and out of the stream.

      Delete
  6. great stuff Alan, i bet that big brookie got your knees knocking! great pictures as always.

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    Replies
    1. brian,
      Thanks.
      Lets just say I sat down for a spell after the encounter.

      Delete
  7. Another outstanding post! That brookie looks like one of your finest. And another at 4lbs! What a great memory indeed. Thanks again for sharing...I hope there is a part 3.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Kiwi,
      Thanks.
      It may very well be, but hold off til you see the one in part three. That brook trout that slipped away was stunning.

      Delete
  8. Great pictures and incredible brook trout colors - truly the colors of fall. Thanks for sharing.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Passinthru Outdoors,
      Thanks.
      It's a wonderful season. Drink it in for the next season is long, oh so long.

      Delete
  9. Brk Trt, again nice post!
    What colorful & healthy looking brookies. Dandy photos to go along with your story.

    Thanks for sharing.........Phil

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. DRYFLYGUY,
      Thanks.
      Phil they were colored up beautifully.

      Delete
  10. The pics remind me what a beautiful place our planet Earth is.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Apache Trout,
      Thanks.
      Certain areas of it for sure.

      Delete
  11. Such fantastic colors...all of them.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Sanders,
      Thanks.
      A favorite time of year.

      Delete
  12. As always mu friend, a great post and wonderful pictures. Our fall is just around the corner, and the fishing is picking up.

    I'm always amazed how your fish take those streamers so readily.

    Thanks.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. fishermanrichard,
      Thanks.
      They certainly do at times. I hope your time on the water this Autumn is good.

      Delete
  13. Alan, I cannot get over how fat those brook trout are in Maine, and they come from those little streams? Absolutely gorgeous...I am so envious. Glad you and the Mrs. had such a wonderful time in what appears to be a beautiful place. Ah...someday...

    Dino

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Anonymous,
      Thanks.
      Sometimes those small streams really surprise me to.
      We had a great time.

      Delete
  14. Good lord Brktrt - that was a great fish you described... and the one you have pic's of is a giant as well. Awesome images!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. will,
      Thanks.
      The images of that trout are etched in my brain, I can almost see him smiling.

      Delete
  15. Incredibly beautiful fish those fall Brookies are. One can only dream of four pound Brookies most of the time, you have "lived" the dream. Thanks, Alan.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Mel Moore,
      Thanks.
      Yes sir even for a brief moment, well worth it.

      Delete
  16. What a great post Alan! You certainly live and fish in some beautiful country. Thanks for taking us along.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. cofisher,
      Thanks.
      Part of small stream angling is the beauty that surrounds us.

      Delete
  17. as beautiful a region in the summer months, that area is even more amazing as Fall colors prevail. Great images...looking forward to Part 3.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Steve,
      Thanks.
      You know that from experience
      from posts I've read on your blog.

      Delete
  18. Great episode Brk Trt..enjoyed muchly!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. penbayman,
      Thanks.
      I enjoyed bringing it to you.

      Delete