Friday, December 21, 2012

Connecticuts "Dark Brook Trout"

While fishing yesterday Mark and I had a few words about the colors of brook trout. He has fished for brookies in several northeast states, and so have I. We talked about the dark colored brook trout of the Adirondacks of New York, and he showed me a photo of one such brook trout, as well as the type of stream it was taken in. This type of black coloration is also found in several small wild brook trout streams I have fished in Connecticut. I have found that most of these streams have tea colored water. This is caused, so I have been told from the conifers which are prevalent in the streams watershed.


This is one of those streams. It's located in far northeast Connecticut. The stream has a healthy population of brook trout. It tends to run warm in the summer but that seems to be not a major problem for the trout, for numbers have been stable since I have been fishing the stream.


These are a few of the dark colored brook trout I have taken from mid April through June.


I have never fished this stream in Autumn, "and I don't know why", just to see if they exhibit the bright orange coloration of their flanks as their cousins.


These guys showed a "strong" liking to a Red Picket Pin.

CLICK IMAGES TO ENLARGE


30 comments:

  1. That is interesting. I wonder if the bottom of the stream is darker than others?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Kevin Frank,
      Thanks.
      The stream bottom is pretty much the same as others I fish.

      Delete
  2. What a treat to see those green stream banks. And those dark brookies remind me of some I catch in Brookie Lake. Gorgeous in every shade.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Jim Yaussy Albright,
      Thanks.
      I was thinking the same....green along the banks. Something to look forward to.

      Delete
  3. That first one is really dark, but still pretty in its own way.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Jay,
      Thanks.
      They're dark but they still have pronounced bright dots along with the halos.

      Delete
  4. Those fish are beautiful. I've never seen them colored like that before.

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    Replies
    1. Mike Rapidan,
      Thanks.
      They surely know how to adapt to their habitat.

      Delete
  5. What a beautiful scene and fish. Happy holidays Alan to you and yours!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. cofisher,
      Thanks.
      Howard the best of the season to you and yours.

      Delete
  6. Great post BT, Thanks for excellent job and consistency.
    Cliff

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    Replies
    1. Anonymous,
      Thanks.
      I appreciate it Cliff.

      Delete
  7. Brk Trt - The variation in coloration is very fascinating to me. These fish above are dark all over but I've also seen ones that are dark across the back and flank only to be cherry red along the belly. For those who like equations: stream chemistry + amount and color of light + geology of the streambed = AMAZING

    Merry Christmas - mark

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    Replies
    1. Mark,
      Thanks. The brook trouts diversity is probably why they have survived since the last ice age. Wonderful creatures.
      Merry Christmas.

      Delete
  8. Such a stark contrast from the brookies I find in South Central Pa, very pale-ish only vivid during the spawn and just as spooky as their spring creek cousins down in the valley.

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    Replies
    1. Bill,
      Thanks.
      They are very different in other parts of their range. Keeps us seeking them for sure.

      Delete
  9. Alan
    Amazing the differnce in the color markings, one would think that the dark color would change some in the sunny warm months. I can see where it would take some really tight cast from the banks of those streams. I also think casting from the stream itself would not be productive, because of the limited space and some of the fast runs. I could spend all day on streams like that. Have a great Christmas!!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Bill Trussell,
      Thanks.
      Bill their colors do lighten some in the summer, but not by much. Wading can be unproductive in small streams. Brookies can pick up that vibration, and scatter quickly.
      Merry Christmas.

      Delete
  10. I once talked to one of the fisheries biologist and he told me a lot of the streams and small lakes in the northeast part of the state have the tea water. I saw it for myself Ice fishing Bigalow hollow one year. Beautiful Stealthy looking trout!

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    Replies
    1. Savage,
      Thanks.
      I know of some of those waters.
      Mashapaug Lake in Union used to be a favorite place for me to set up a few tip-ups.

      Delete
  11. Alan, thanks so much for sharing. Don't know if I have ever seen a Brookie that dark. Interesting that it differs from one stream to another in the same area. Enjoyed the looks of the stream. Pretty inviting! Happy Hook ups in 2013.

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    Replies
    1. Mel Moore,
      Thanks.
      That stream has some of the darkest brookies I've seen. Just a few miles east of that stream is another I fish. The brookies are a lot lighter.
      Holiday Wishes to you.

      Delete
  12. wonderful colors...I am always amazed by the variations of color from the fish you have photographed.

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    Replies
    1. Steve,
      Thanks.
      Good to see you out and about, fully mended hopefully.
      They do differ indeed. Most of the wild brookies I've taken in the Farmy have that lighter color.

      Delete
  13. Very nice variation- always interesting to see.

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    Replies
    1. Peter Patenaude,
      Thanks.
      That's why I love those guys.
      Do you have lots of snow up there?

      Delete
  14. Hi Alan!

    It truly looks like a wonderful place to fish! I've seen a large spectra of coloration on trout too. Some dark and others like pure silver with spots. Just to let you know, I've published a fly swap offer on my blog now. Would be fun if you feel up to participate.

    Your friend in a snowy and cold Sweden,
    Mats Olsson

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The Jassid Man,
      Thanks.
      I saw your blog, and the flies your submitting. Perhaps after the New Year I'll get in on it.

      Delete
  15. I'm going to bet that this little stream has a very dark bottom as well. Not only do the trout sometimes take on the general color tint of the river bottom for better camo, but a number of the nymphs will color morph as well. It's always amazed me how nature adjusts to give trout and many other animals the ability to improve their odds when it come to blending into their surrounding! Beautiful little guys!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Midgeman,
      Thanks.
      You will win that bet, dark as can be. It's truly amazing the tools mom nature provides her creatures.

      Delete