Tuesday, January 29, 2013

A Small Stream, and its Seasons

Each season presents it's challenges and satisfactions. This small stream located in Connecticut's foot hills shows its beauty in two of those seasons. This past weekend we paid a visit to see how winter was treating it. We were in the midst of a deep freeze and the stream showed the results of the cold. Shelf ice was pretty evident and in some places completely covered the stream. In other areas there could be seen a nice flow of open water.


As I stood looking at the stream I wondered how its wild residents were holding up. Was it at a point where the cold would so bad that it would hamper life. Food sources would be hard to get, and staying alive would be a challenge to say the least. I then said to myself,..these are wild brook trout, they have chosen this place to live, and they will survive and flourish here just as they have for years. I am thankful there are still these small streams where in most cases they will be protected to do as they have been doing since they took up residence here so long ago.


The same stream in a kinder gentler season. Mid spring, insects aplenty. The stream flows at a cool friendlier pace, and the harsh winter is just a fast fading memory.


It is in this section of stream where I'll cast a "Bomber" dry fly, perhaps where the tree is. And a wild brook trout will rise and make my day.


You need but one to hand.

CLICK IMAGES TO ENLARGE


31 comments:

  1. Looks like you're going to have to get an ice auger Brk Trt..

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. penbayman,
      thanks.
      That or wait 'til spring.

      Delete
  2. It sure is a different world in and along the streams this time of year. I like the photo's of the same spot in different seasons. I've always wanted to take a photograph at the same place for each month of the year but have yet to accomplish it, maybe this year.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Bill,
      thanks.
      Each season has its good and bad. It's nice to see such in our photos.

      Delete
  3. Personally, I like the summer look much better.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Mark Kautz,
      thanks.
      Right about now I'm leaning that way too.

      Delete
  4. Hard to imagine sometimes but springtimes edging ever closer!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. brian,
      thanks.
      Very true, ever so slow though.

      Delete
  5. I don't know about you, but I can't wait until spring. This weather is killing me.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. RKM,
      thanks.
      I'm not a big fan of the cold. But the rewards of a healthy stream makes it bearable.

      Delete
  6. The original "Bomber"- as good for wild Brookies as the "Stealth Bomber" is for bass. It's hard to believe those little guys survive the elements... shows just how hearty they are as long as we don't mess things up too much. Very nice photos as always.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Jay,
      thanks.
      When I read your post this morning I was thinking the same thing.

      Delete
  7. I don't know about you, but I derive comfort from the notion that when my life's seasons are done, those of our streams will go on and on.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. tenkara ambassador,
      thanks.
      It's the hope of many of us.

      Delete
  8. Hi Alan!

    Lovely pictures of a beautiful little stream holding treasures in form of brook trout! Wonderful!

    Greetings from at present a little milder tempered north,
    Mats Olsson

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The Jassid Man,
      Thanks.
      They were refreshing.
      It's good to hear of your heat wave.

      Delete
  9. Nice post! Maybe by Thursday it will open up a little for you to get some fishing in.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Savage,
      Thanks.
      We have a slight moderation in temps....maybe 55 degrees.

      Delete
  10. Its quite amazing the conditions fish tolerate, your spring picture has got me drooling, im really looking forward to casting at rising trout again.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Col,
      Thanks.
      Brookies are masters of adaption.
      Rising trout a nice thought for sure.

      Delete
  11. Alan
    What nymph would you use in this stream or do you just use dries most of the time here? Would this stream fit a small streamer? Outstanding looking stream---thanks for sharing

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Bill Trussell,
      Thanks.
      I don't usually fish nymphs. I would fish a wet fly, soft hackles and dries.
      A small Mickey Finn or Edson Tiger streamer has taken brookies in this stream.

      Delete
  12. everything to its season, but i'd prefer 'kindler, gentler'. :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. TexWisGirl,
      Thanks.
      Very true. And I for one have the same preference.

      Delete
  13. Alan,
    I love the 2 pics of the same stretch of water (pics 2 & 4) with one winter, one spring. I'd tossed that bomber up along the right seam edge and let it dump back into the pool at the bottom below the bent tree. Got to be a fish or two in that run!
    -BT

    ReplyDelete
  14. Browntrout,
    Thanks.
    A fine placement for sure.

    ReplyDelete
  15. Replies
    1. Peter Patenaude,
      Thanks.
      I appreciate your comment.

      Delete
  16. How can winter look so pretty and be so miserable to live in?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. cofisher,
      Thanks.
      Howard you said it.
      Hold on springs a coming.

      Delete