Tuesday, April 23, 2013

Could There Be Something To This

I purchased this book years ago because I enjoyed the concept of matching insect hatches with the timing of flowers blooming. The book is informative and easy to read, and authored by fly anglers. Small streams do have insect hatches, although not as prolific as larger rivers. The wild trout that inhabit these small streams are usually not selective and will eat anything that looks like food. Then again if you have a lot of one bug coming off the bottom and hatching it's most likely to catch someones eye, namely the trout.

Yesterday I decided to test the idea out. Knowing that Trillium was about to bloom I carried a variety of March Brown flies. The book claims that Trillium and March Brown mayflies go together. The patterns carried were Catskill style dries, a soft hackle wet, some emergers, and parachute dries. They were all of the basic colors of the March Brown.

The Trillium was in bloom, and they were beautiful. Later in the afternoon I noticed a few flies in the air and tied on the Catskill dry. The fly was not taken, even with a long tryout. The soft hackle produced a few hits and one nice brook trout. Next the emerger was tried and it brought several nice fish to hand. But the parachute March Brown was the best. They really attacked it.


The assortment of March Brown look a likes.


Is there something to this "Trout Flies and Flowers"


CLICK IMAGES TO ENLARGE

22 comments:

  1. I'd guess your experiment was a success. Beautiful photos Alan.

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    1. Howard Levett,
      Thanks.
      So far. I will test more today.
      Howard I've been unable to post a comment on your blog.

      Delete
  2. I believe there is something to it. Nice photo's!

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  3. The way parachutes sit in the surface film drives them trout crazy! :) Nice job Al!

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    1. Apache Trout,
      Thanks.
      A nice low profile.

      Delete
  4. Looks like a great book, might have to order and add to my collection!

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    Replies
    1. LQN,
      Thanks.
      I think you'll enjoy it.

      Delete
  5. You asked us if there was anything in this link between flowers and the flies the trout will eat. Here's my two pennyworth...

    It's a happy coincidence! Certain flowers appear at the same times of the year as certain flies appear. Also during certain conditions, particularly early in the season.

    In England we have a flower called Lesser Celandine, it appears from March until the end of May. It is a prostrate little plant with bright yellow flowers. To attract pollonators it opens up wide and displays its yolk coloured petals like a brash advertisement. If rain is in the offing the flowers close up. This coincides with quite poor prospects of finding flies of the season (in England the Large Dark Olive) on the water. If the flowers are open, however, you can bet on dry weather for a few hours and Lo and Behold! The flies are also out on the water and your prospects of Sport are very good.

    I don't think the flowers influence the flies. The flies and the flowers are simply both influenced by the weather and the season of the year...

    Nice idea for a book though and I love the way you matched the book cover with real life for us. I'd never heard of the Wake Robin or Trillium before your blogpost.


    RR

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    1. Regular Rod,
      Thanks.
      I really enjoyed your insight. I think the readers of this blog did also.

      Delete
  6. The logic and interconnectedness of nature never fail to amaze. Observations like these add a whole nother dimension to trout fishing.

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    1. tenkara ambassador,
      Thanks.
      A lot said there.

      Delete
  7. That book is spot on most of the time and is one of my referrals every season. I will start with a nymph first and move up from there. Once you identify other plants and insects you can add to the list also.
    Tie up a few Jacklin's March Brown nymphs to add to your selection. Solid pattern for the spring and good impression of an immature stonefly year round.
    Todd

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    Replies
    1. Todd,
      Thanks.
      It's great to hear of another that follows there little signs that nature gives us.
      Are you fishing in Rangeley yet?

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    2. Alan, I'm usually in the Rangeley area in September and not in the well known waters. I do know it's a cold spring. At yesterdays spey class water temps were in the low forties.

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  8. Alan - The books looks interesting, I will have to find a copy. I agree with Regular Rod and Todd; what is blooming is affected by temperature and moisture levels, the same thing that influences the timing of insect hatches when water temperature is factored in. I always take note of what's in bloom and jot it down to help me better understand when various insects emerge. My guess that the success of the parachute is due to the fact that it can resemble an emerger sitting low in the water and the body of the fly is clearly visible in the film. Another reason I like comparaduns (hint and a wink)

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    Replies
    1. Mark,
      Thanks.
      You Todd and Rod all seem to agree.
      The parachute was working well yesterday, next time out I'll give a Haystack a shot.

      Delete
  9. I checked that book out from my local library last year....I think there IS something to it! Fascinating correlations, at any rate.

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    1. e.m.b.,
      Thanks.
      It's a wonderful little book. Nice side notes too.

      Delete
  10. Alan
    Just like the Dogwood brings the season of the crappie the Trillium brings the March Flies. I did a Google search and found Trout Flies and Flowers less than 20.00 bucks at Amazon. I put my order in; I am liking in the fly selection at time when I am on the water. This book will be a great addition to my learning process. Thanks for sharing

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    Replies
    1. Bill Trussell,
      Thanks.
      See, it also works in other areas of the country.
      I know you'll enjoy the book.

      Delete
  11. Thanks for the tip on the book Alan. It's going on my must buy list. You sure do fish some beautiful places.

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