Monday, April 1, 2013

Early Spring

Early spring fly fishing on a small stream can be a bit frustrating. You have so many variables to contend with, such as high water, off color, cold water, moderating water, hungry fish, and selective fish, trying to figure what's the best plan of attack to go with is where the frustration comes to play.

Should I fish a wet fly, streamer, or my preference a dry fly. There are those that would fish nymphs on the bottom, and most are successful in that approach. Well here's how I approached the problem of where the fish wanted to feed.

Saturday was bright and clear. The stream was perfect. I started fishing wets, and moved the flies all over the water, soft spots, riffles and those seams, with no response. I tied on a few different streamers with the same result. Moving to the dry fly and hoping this was the fly of choice, which it was not. There were quite a few stone flies about, but nothing seemed to keying in on them, or the other micro bugs about.
The only fly not offered this day was a nymph. While this is my not my favorite way of fishing it was a last chance of finding a willing fish. Because I don't often fish nymphs my selection is VERY limited. A beadhead pheasasnt tail, prince, and a few of the beadheads Mark tied for me. I tied on a beadhead Picket Finn that Mark tied for me and started working the water. On the third drift as the fly hung in a sweet spot in a seam I took a solid hit. Several more casts and another hit. It was obvious what they wanted to eat. As I moved to another spot and started drifting the nymph. On the retrieve I had my first hookup. As the fish came close to my hand a quick dart to the right and he was off, with the fly in his lip. A poor knot was the reason.


I had about an hour left to fish so I moved way downstream to some long slow and deep pools where in the past I have taken some nice browns. I had a choice of two nymphs, PT or Prince, I selected the Prince. I don't know if it was the best choice, but it worked. Soon a nice brookie was at hand. It was sparkling has I lifted it to take a photo.


Further downstream I was gifted by another brook trout, also on the Prince. As I stepped out of the stream and started walking back to my car I realized I had taken two brook trout from sections of the stream where only browns have been caught. What could this mean?



CLICK IMAGES TO INLARGE


20 comments:

  1. Brk Trt,
    nice post. I to am a dry fly guy, and they are my preference. But second preference in line is the BH Prince nymph either in standard, or some of the recent spin off's, they all work great!!

    If I was to only choose any two flies to carry in my box & just those, they would be any Wulff pattern, then the prince nymph

    Well done all around.........Phil

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. DRYFLYGUY,
      Thanks.
      Those would be two very good choices.

      Delete
  2. Hi Alan. Just goes to show you, you have to give them what they want. In my case, it's usually the one in the box I didn't bring.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Mark Kautz,
      Thanks.
      That's usually what happens to me.

      Delete
  3. Sometimes the fish win! Particularly if the angler is not flexible. Obviously, you went through the cycle you might say before you figured out what they wanted. In the end, your flexibility made the day. Love small streams.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Rainbow Chaser,
      Thanks.
      Your right Mel.

      Delete
  4. Hi Alan!

    Nice stream for fly fishing. Sometimes the only way to get a response from the trout is to get deep in the stream. Particularly in spring I've had to do the same. The trout doesn't have energy enough to chase for food. So we have to get the flies close to those trout that lurk around in the deep holes in the stream. Good to hear that you got a couple of trout as a reward for changing flies. Pretty soon they will start rising to pick food at the surface. Then it's time for dry fly which is my preference too. Thanks for sharing!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The Jassid Man,
      Thanks.
      Sort of like bouncing the food in front of their noses.

      Delete
  5. well done Alan, you cracked the code switching to the prince nymph, nice brookies.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. brian,
      Thanks.
      It sure worked this time.

      Delete
  6. Nice job Alan ! I would prefer to fish dries but it pays to be flexible and early in the year is the time to bounce the bottom with a flashy nymph. Nice to hear the Picket Finns were getting some attention. With regard to the browns being shy this time of year, my experience is very similar

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Mark,
      Thanks.
      I guess your right. On the browns being shy, I was perhaps thinking the brookies are getting the upper hand in the stream.

      Delete
  7. You do a great job with your flies. The streamer looks great.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Savage,
      Thanks.
      The streamer is a fly that was tied by Mark at "Fishing Small Streams" Its called the 13th Lake Streamer.

      Delete
  8. Excellent post Brk Trt....is that streamer a 13th lake? Beautiful brookies.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Kiwi,
      Thanks.
      Yes it is. It was tied by Mark at "Fishing Small Streams".

      Delete
  9. Alan
    That streamer is so trout friendly looking, the colors are a perfect fit. I am really impressed with this pattern. Were these brooks taken on the 2wt? Thanks for sharing

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Bill Trussell,
      Thanks.
      The streamer has a history in the Adirondacks.
      They were taken on the TQR 5ft 2wt.

      Delete
  10. I'm not much of a nymph fisherman either but sometimes it seems you have no choice. Really, I only enjoy fishing them when I can see the fish. Fishing nymphs blindly is like watching paint dry for me. lol Good to see you had some success!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Bill,
      Thanks.
      You echo my feelings 100%

      Delete