Thursday, May 23, 2013

"Henryville Special"

The Pocono mountains of eastern Pennsylvania are probably best known for their status as the place for honeymoons. To those who fly fish it's also a trout paradise, both small stream and bigger. Many anglers believe that dry fly fishing in the United States first originated here, and in particular on Brodhead Creek.

Brodhead Creek flows to meet the Delaware and offers some fantastic fly fishing. One section called the Henryville is where this fly gets its name. The "Henryville Special" was created by Hiram Brobst back in the thirties. It is a caddis fly and has a reputation as a fish taker. A versatile pattern it can be fished dry in a traditional manner or one can swing it as a wet fly and it works very well skittered across the surface.

I have carried and fished the Henryville Special since taking up fly fishing. They say every fly has its day, but I'd bet this one would have that day every day.
This is a small stream in the Poconos I've fished many times. The Henryville Special has worked very well here.


This small stream in Connecticut I fished the other day. In this little riffled run I managed to have four hookups. They were taken on a variety of presentations.


Of the four hookups, this wonderful wild fella is the only one to allow me a photo.


So if you haven't tried the Henryville Special, I would highly recommend you try it. The fly works in sizes 12 to 16.


CLICK IMAGES TO ENLARGE

16 comments:

  1. I've got a couple of those. Great post my friend!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Apache Trout,
      Thanks.
      John they're underrated.

      Delete
  2. Replies
    1. TexWisGirl,
      Thanks.
      They're special places.

      Delete
  3. Hi Alan!

    Nice fly! I bet it is a good trout magnet wherever you try it. Lovely pictures of small streams! Sad to say I haven't been on my first outing yet for a number of reasons but I'm looking forward to and dreaming about it at least.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The Jassid Man,
      Thanks.
      Mats it sure is. I'm still waiting for a report.

      Delete
  4. Nice post and great pattern.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. LQN,
      Thanks.
      They sure are fish takers.

      Delete
  5. The Henryville and its cousin, the Hemingway caddis, are two great patterns. They've both worked very well for me on the small streams that we frequent.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. RKM,
      Thanks.
      Kirk both patterns are very similar, and they do draw attention.

      Delete
  6. A little feisty were they? A really pretty stream there Brk Trt..

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    Replies
    1. penbayman,
      Thanks.
      Mike they sure were putting up quite the fuss.
      Woodland streams are tops. I'm sure you know of a few tucked away in the fir trees.

      Delete
  7. Alan
    Thanks for sharing another great pattern that can be so versatile. I really like the header pic.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Bill Trussell,
      Thanks.
      Bill the Henryville Special has brought many fish to the surface.
      That streamer is "Indian Rock"

      Delete
  8. Good to read about someone else still fishing this pattern, which you don't see much, at least out West. The Henry has been my favorite caddis pattern for as long as I can remember. Tied correctly, it is durable and floats almost as well as the elk hair, but is a much better choice for selective trout and quieter waters.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Unknown,
      Thanks.
      We've got to keep those classic flies fishing.
      Very true.

      Delete