Friday, May 17, 2013

"Red Brook" Spring 2013

Yesterday we took a trip to a special stream in Massachusetts. It's a coastal stream that flows into the salt water on Cape Cod. I have fished this stream for about 5 years now and have been blessed with wonderful outings each time. This stream is a fresh water stream that is about 5 miles long. It has several cold springs along its length making it suitable for wild brook trout. These brook trout are a special group. Some of them will go to sea and spend part of there life there returning back to the fresh cold waters of Red Brook.

To spend time here is a most pleasant and rewarding experience. To see the awesome work that has taken place here over the years. Many groups have been part of this effort to protect this habitat and the "Salters" that call Red Brook home. Mass. Fish and Wildlife, Trout Unlimited, Trustees of Reservations, and The Lyman family who donated the land that Red Brook flows through. Hopefully Red Brook will remain safe and protected for generations to come.

Native grasses and trees were planted to protect the stream.


While not your typical freestone mountain stream Red Brook provides many challenges to the fly angler.


A walk along the stream provides the angler with a vast amount of sights, sounds and smells. One such smell is that of salty air mixed with pine. Ospreys can be seen circling over head, and the bird symphony is sweet music.


There is no rush. Take time to enjoy a lunch.


This is danger to most everybody.


While these are brook trout they do not act like other brook trout. They do not take flies that represent insects. They have a profound love of streamers. Red Brook having access to the sea also host a good run of herring. Herring spawn and porvide the brook trout an ample source of herring fry to dine on. Thus the fondness of streamers. This simple marabou streamer was very productive.


Red Brook has a very sandy bottom. You must look for the gravel that has been washed out, along with underwater structure and you'll find brook trout.


As you can see these brookies will take a streamer. Quite a few of these guys were hooked, and a few came to hand.


You can see the reddish tint to the water, giving Red Brook its name. In the water are islands of green vegetation. Work your streamer near and perhaps you'll get lucky. Such was the case yesterday.


A beautiful Red Brook wild brook trout. Perhaps this fish will take to the salt.


Buttermilk Bay, and Cape Cod. May the "Salter" brook trout swim these waters forever.

I have a link posted below for the Searun Brook Trout Coalition. A great organization dedicated to the "Salter" Check them out.


CLICK IMAGES TO ENLARGE











26 comments:

  1. Not really sure why some one would use such a huge lure on that stream. I guess it was all they had.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Kevin Frank,
      Thanks.
      Not so much the size, how about the two sets of treble hooks.

      Delete
  2. Lovely stream, that lure in the trees looks deadly , I've come across a few on my travels at eye height.

    The streamer looks smashing .

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Col,
      Thanks.
      I would guess most of us probably have encountered them.
      The streamer worked well.

      Delete
  3. Nice, hope the brookies continue to flourish there for many more generations.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. LQN,
      Thanks.
      It's a great place to fish, you might want to give a shot...a nice weekend.

      Delete
  4. A very enjoyable read on what looks like a wonderful stream.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. brian,
      Thanks.
      It truly is wonderful.

      Delete
  5. You keep revealing more gems in your area. What a great place. It's good just to know that Red Brook and its salters exist. Thanks!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Jim Yaussy Albright,
      Thanks.
      They are wonderful little marvels.

      Delete
  6. Alan
    Unusual water color for the stream----have you ever landed a brook there on a dry, really a pretty place to float one--by the way have you priced a Rapala lately, which is the lure in the brush--over 7.00 bucks--thanks for sharing

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Bill Trussell,
      Thanks.
      The reddish tint to the water comes from the bottom. That's how it got the name Red Brook.
      I have taken one on a dry before. I think it was a Haystack.

      Delete
  7. What a beautiful place. I hope to go there sometime. I'm glad you made it and had some luck.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. RKM,
      Thanks.
      It's special.
      It can be a great day trip. You ready?

      Delete
  8. Hey Alan. A great place to be protected. Thanks for the tour.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Mark Kautz,
      Thanks.
      It sure is Mark. I'm glad that it will be protected.

      Delete
  9. Thanks for sharing this area, it's very beautiful. I guess I didn't know that brook trout would take to the sea when given the chance. Excellent post - awesome little trouts.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Casey,
      Thanks.
      They are quite special. The marine environment offers so much in the way of food.

      Delete
  10. Beautiful place- glad it is being protected.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Terri,
      Thanks.
      Welcome. I'm glad you like Red Brook. Protected it is.

      Delete
  11. Great post, Alan...and my sister just moved back to the Cape, only 5 hours away!! May have to hang up the 13 footers for the next trip!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Gary,
      Thanks.
      It would be a good trip for you to take. Small streams, salter brook trout, and you can bring the 13 footers and fish stripers.

      Delete
  12. Lovely looking but it also looks like a fly-eater to me.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Howard,
      Thanks.
      It can remove a few flies from your box.

      Delete
  13. I always enjoy your posts about Red Brook and the salters..

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. penbayman,
      Thanks.
      Mike I enjoy bringing them to you.
      You have a few salter streams that are being looked at by the Sea Run Brook Trout Coalition.
      Good stuff.

      Delete