Monday, July 1, 2013

Recovery of a Small Stream

On this last day of June I decided to visit a stream I had not fished since last fall. At that time the fishing was very slow, and what brookies were taken were very small. In the past this stream had given up some nice fish and the thought was the hot dry summer, and the previous cold winter took a devastating toll on the mature brook trout. I did not expect to find what I did this day. The water level was in good shape and the stream was cold. In the pools I could see brookies scattering, and even a few rises. In these streams a rise could be for almost anything and the best fly choice would be a bomber, but since I had a parachute tied on already I let it fly. As it turned out that was all that was necessary.


It's hard to tell from these photos but the stream has some really deep holes and that's where the trout were holding.


They hit the fly as soon as hit the water. The fish were in good shape and starting to take on some vibrant color.


The wonder of nature....recovery from very bad conditions.


The magic of small stream angling.

CLICK IMAGES TO ENLARGE


20 comments:

  1. I'm glad to hear that it was in good shape. When I get back I'll have to visit it.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. RKM,
      Thanks.
      Nice deep cold runs with willing brookies.
      I'm with you.

      Delete
  2. Hi Alan!

    Lovely stream! I really like the sorroundings of it too and that it's in a good state. Unfortunately I don't have streams like that nearby anymore since I moved to Gävle; a town by the coast.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The Jassid Man,
      Thanks.
      Wonderful setting for sure.
      A move in life is sometimes is good and sometimes not so good. Hope yours turns out to be good.

      Delete
  3. Replies
    1. TexWisGirl,
      Thanks.
      I was going to take photos of some moss that was so thick, like a shag carpet.

      Delete
  4. Beautiful looking stream Alan.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. LQN,
      Thanks.
      The residents came back nicely.

      Delete
  5. Alan
    I think the dry will get a take instantly most of the time if the trout are feeding as opposed to using a nymph. I have found that the nymph may travel in front of the trout numbers of times before they will commit to a hit. I am going by what the trout reaction is on the tailrace here it may be different there outstanding colors on the brook trout---thanks for sharing

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Bill Trussell,
      Thanks.
      Very true my friend.

      Delete
  6. Lovely small streams and beautiful brookies. Thanks for sharing...:)

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    Replies
    1. troutbirder,
      Thanks.
      They are both a bit of heaven.

      Delete
  7. Wow, those Brookies are so pretty. Seems like they have endured the issues they were faced with. Wishin' I was fishin' it with you.

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    Replies
    1. Mel,
      Thanks.
      It's truly amazing their will to keep going on.

      Delete
  8. A beautiful little stream with the brookies to match. It's amazing what delicate creatures they can be and how they have managed to survive for thousands of years under, at times, very difficult conditions.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Kiwi,
      Thanks.
      They have that tenacity to do whatever is necessary to carry on.
      "delicate power"

      Delete
  9. Alan, I think you've got to have some of the prettiest small trout water anywhere. Beautiful.

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    Replies
    1. Howard,
      Thanks.
      There's some very sweet streams about.

      Delete
  10. Looks like a great place for a little bit of solitude. A place to revisit for sure! So green!

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    Replies
    1. The River Damsel,
      Thanks.
      Your right, and that's one of the reasons I like little waters.

      Delete