Saturday, October 12, 2013

Have I mentioned..........

Picket Pin wet fly
Have I ever told you how much I love this fly? Well perhaps I have made a statement or two about it in the past about its ability to take trout. Well such was a day last week. I was fishing the Farmington on a cool overcast day. The activity on the river was slow. A few midges, and some caddis. I started fishing various caddis dries and they were not respected at all. I switched to some streamers, which managed to attract some juvenile salmon. The next choice was the Picket Pin wet fly. On the third or forth swing I had my first trout. The fish proved to be one I could not bring to hand. Several more casts later a brown took the fly, and was like a bull dog. I continued to fish the Pin until interest was no longer paid.


Dark Cahill wet fly
I then tied on another staple wet fly in my box. The dark Cahill. This fly was also a winner this overcast day. There is an old saying, "on a bright day fish a bright fly" and on a dark day fish a dark fly" there may be some truth to it.


A beautiful river on a gray autumn day.


Yes a Picket Pin just moving under the surface was to much for this brown.


A Connecticut native
This brook trout was truly special. He took the dark Cahil on a dead drift, as I tried to set the hook it came free. As I began to retrieve the fly he hit it again, and I managed to bring him in.

I can't express in words the feeling I have when I bring one of these beautiful creatures to hand in the fall.


Two pretty simple wet flies and a day that's remembered.

There is a great tying video on the Picket Pin at Matt Groberts blog "Caddis Chronicles" check it out.

24 comments:

  1. Nice job Alan - time to put the dries away and start fishing wets !

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Mark,
      Thanks.
      Not so fast on putting the dries to sleep. I also had a very interesting day with with caddis dries.....skating them.

      Delete
  2. I love an old, traditional fly, tied with natural materials. Makes me feel part of the angling continuum.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. tenkara ambassador,
      Thanks.
      They're old and still active....must be a reason.

      Delete
  3. Beautiful fish Alan. Some days, when I'm not the human tackle box and pack light :-) , all I carry is an Altoid tin with some Picket Pins, Hornbergs, Adams & Ausable Bombers. Hard to beat their versatility.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Apache Trout,
      Thanks.
      John I've seen what you pack at times, it's a wonder you don't have back problems.
      I agree with you on the value of the flies you mentioned.

      Delete
  4. Alan
    I love it when the trout comes back for a second hit. Does the Farmington have a lot of generating going in a week’s time? Is there a generating schedule you can check to see when there is heavy generation? I only fish the tailrace here when the generators are off and there is a slow continuous flow. I am so impressed with Picket Pin Pattern!! Thanks for sharing

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Bill Trussell,
      Thanks.
      The Farmington is not used to generate power, although there is a very small plant there it does not effect to flow. The river is dammed at several locations, some for flood control and some dams that were used for various mill operations in years past. The flow rates are pretty stable when the weather cooperates. I think if you google Farmington River you'll learn so much more.
      The Picket Pin is a good fly

      Delete
  5. I couldn't agree with you more about being speechless when holding a brookie. The melt my heart may be the closest way to describe it.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Good flies, a nice stretch of water, beautiful fish, and fall colors. Does it get any better?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Bill,
      Thanks.
      Not as far as I'm concerned.

      Delete
  7. I can only echo was Bill just said. That brown is a prize winner.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Howard,
      Thanks.
      He takes no back seat to the brookie.

      Delete
  8. Nothing like two older standard patterns that have been taking fish for years. Nice job giving them their due credit. Beautiful setting on the river intended to put you in the perfect mood for a good day of fishing.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Mel Moore,
      Thanks.
      They work as well today as the day they were created.

      Delete
  9. You'd have to watch your digits taking the fly out that Brookies mouth. He's a toothy critter.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Col,
      Thanks.
      They are that. but the more they strike the more material they remove from the fly, and that makes the fly better.

      Delete
  10. I'm curious as to whether you you fish these flies under an indicator?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. tim,
      Thanks.
      No I don't. I fish them quartering downstream, and then retrieve using various speeds. The fly is working under the surface.

      Delete
  11. Hi Brk Trt,

    Very nice. Maybe you could do a post about fishing wets? Seems a lost art and not too many anglers using it. I'd love to read your thoughts and expertise.

    Mike

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Michael Curry,
      Thanks.
      I plan on doing that in my next post. I'm far from being an expert but will give you my thoughts.

      Delete
  12. Replies
    1. Matt Grobert,
      Thanks.
      I always appreciate you stopping by.

      Delete