Monday, October 21, 2013

"Jim's Brook"

There is a stream in northern Connecticut that I've had the pleasure of fishing for years. It s a typical freestone mountain stream with large boulders and lots of twists and turns. I do not know its origin, but it must be full of water for this stream has ample flows at a time when rain has been a bit scarce. The stream flows through large stands of hemlock and hardwoods and has a beautiful amber tint to its waters. The smells of this woodland are hard to describe. Just upstream from the pool in the first photo is a tributary to the brook. This trib comes in through private property and also has real good flows. One day while fishing the stream I had the pleasure of meeting a lady who was walking her dog. We stopped to chat and she was very helpful in my quest to find out more about the little trib. She told me the name of it was Jim's Brook, a name given the stream by a landowner that owns a large chunk of the property that the stream flows through. She told me where the house was of the landowner. Now I have a good chance to perhaps gain access to Jim's Brook. By the way the lady I was talking to was 87 years old, and she said she would love to tell me some stories about the brook I was fishing but she had to get to work. " God Bless her"


I fished the stream that day, the leaves of many of the hardwoods have already fallen. As the sun hit various runs and pools I noticed a brook trout or two dart for cover.


It's a beautiful time of year to drift a dry fly through tea colored waters. The leaf litter on the bottom seems to reflect the colors of fall so brilliantly to the surface.


In one such pool I was able to get this jewel to take a dry fly. The brookie and water in which he came from were almost the same.

I now have a place to explore. Perhaps "Jim's Brook" will as good as the brook it delivers its cold waters to.




28 comments:

  1. Alan
    Outstanding looking stream, have you found any springs that feed streams like this in the area? It is amazing to find an 87 year lady out walking and still working!!! This reminds me of the 84 year old man at our trout fest this past year. He was giving a talk on how one at his age can still get out and trout fish local streams. I hope that is you and I one day. Thanks for sharing a great post.

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    Replies
    1. Bill Trussell,
      Thanks.
      They say the best way to locate springs that come up within the stream is to walk in the stream barefoot. Your feet can pick up the water temp difference. That's where a spring is coming up. Another way is to locate a redd, that's where spawning trout are. They usually deposit their eggs there because there is a constant flow of pretty uniform water. I have a post coming up where I'll show you a redd.

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  2. Good stuff buddy.
    There is a man well into his 90's who fly fishes the Mianus River in CT. He recently stopped fishing the banks but still fishes from the bridge.
    Fly fishing keeps us all young. :-)

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    Replies
    1. Apache Trout,
      Thanks.
      That's amazing. Fly fishing the natural tonic.

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  3. love the leaves falling on those rocks. so pretty. bless that woman!

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    1. TexWisGirl,
      Thanks.
      Quote relaxing. She is special.

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  4. Beautiful, love the stream banks covered with fall leaves.

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    Replies
    1. LQN,
      Thanks.
      They are so pretty, and they give you a sensation of hooking up.

      Delete
  5. That looks like a glorious place to spend a day. As fly fishermen we should consider ourselves lucky to be witness to so much of natures beauty.

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    1. HighPlainsFlyFisher,
      Thanks.
      So very true my friend.

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  6. A couple of beautiful little streams there, Alan, in which to enjoy the incomparable beauty of brook trout and one of the most colorful autumns in recent years. Thank you.

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    Replies
    1. rivertoprambles,
      Thanks.
      I agree with you that this was a wonderful year for color.

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  7. That brookie is a beauty and I'm guessing Jim's Brook will be a keeper too...

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    Replies
    1. penbayman,
      Thanks.
      That's what I'm hoping for.

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  8. My Dad always told me that if you don't ask (to fish Jim's Brook) the answer is always "no".

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    Replies
    1. Mark Kautz,
      Thanks.
      Your dad was right.

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  9. Beautiful stream with the jewels to prove it.

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    Replies
    1. Kiwi,
      Thanks.
      On that day they were outstanding.

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  10. Nice stream BT. i'm always impressed by the nice looking brooks you fish. I always looks for jewels like that in my (sturbridge) area, but i feel they are few or too warm or silted if i find them, but i won't stop looking-cliff

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    Replies
    1. cphaneuf,
      Thanks.I'm fortunate for the many small waters available to me, as well as very thankful.

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  11. Nice to see there is water flowing somewhere !

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    Replies
    1. Mark,
      Thanks.
      I know. We could use rain for sure.

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  12. Lovely spot Alan. I just love your state.

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  13. This is one of my favorite web sites to visit. My Steelhead river has nothing on the brooks you fish. I hope the Lord blesses you with long health because I love living small stream fishing through your posts...Bravo!

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    Replies
    1. tim,
      Thanks.
      I'm glad I can provide some enjoyment to you and other anglers who share the passion of little waters.
      I'm thankful for your reading and commenting.

      Delete
  14. PS please keep us posted on the outcome to access to Jim's Brook.

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