Tuesday, November 5, 2013

Striking Gold

Sunday presented an opportunity to fish a beautiful wild trout stream for a few hours. So Kirk and I got together and did just that. We met at the stream about 9 AM and found its waters flowing, but in need of some rain. The skies were sunny and the air had a November chill. There was a breeze that brought both tree and land based leaves into the stream. We rigged up and set the plan. We were going to fish upstream, and then fish downstream some before leaving.

I tried fishing nymphs, wets and dries, Kirk choosing to do the same. In the span of three hours I managed a few hits, and a very small brook trout. Kirk fared somewhat better. So it was off to fish downstream. I fished the very first pool while Kirk went down. After working that pool with no luck I started to walk downstream. A few minutes later I saw Kirk coming back. He told me he just walked the stream and had to leave. After he left I sat down and took some photos of the sun working its magic along the stream. In the waning days of Autumns leaf spectacular I was about to take it all in.

The gold colored leaves can be seen through the water. It was in this pool just below the boulder where the cast nymph found true gold. The beautifully colored wild brown ran and twisted trying to shake the gold bead in his jaw. But fortune let me bring him to hand. A quick photo and he slipped into the stream and vanished among the leaves. Gold was found this day, in many ways.







24 comments:

  1. Brk Trt,
    You don't speak of using nymphs much in your past blog entries? Your usually a wet & dry fly kind'a guy. Just curious, the nymph looks like a BH pheasant tail, or a dark hairs ear??
    But as usual, well done & beautiful.........Phil

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. DRYFLYGUY,
      Thanks.
      The reason I don't fish nymphs much is cause they have a tendency to get snagged on everything. But there is no doubt they take fish.
      Phil the nymph was a BH gold ribbed hares ear.

      Delete
  2. Pretty PIcs!! Like the Browns!!

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    Replies
    1. TROUT1,
      Thanks.
      They were very handsome.

      Delete
  3. Replies
    1. TexWisGirl,
      Thanks.
      One need not fish to be truly satisfied in such places.

      Delete
  4. Another type of gold mining, so to speak. Great pictures.

    ReplyDelete
  5. "small streams, wild trout, and life...in their simplest form" Alan, your blog header about says it all for this post. Great pictures!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Mel Moore,
      Thanks,
      That sort of sums it all up Mel.

      Delete
  6. Gold is the perfect metaphor. The beauty of nature is priceless.

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    Replies
    1. Peter Carlson,
      Thanks.
      There are those times when it all seems to come together.

      Delete
  7. Great close-up image of the brown. Much more colorful than the one that I caught.

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    Replies
    1. RKM,
      Thanks.
      The new camera is a gem. The subjects were also good

      Delete
  8. Beautiful looking fall day Alan!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. LQN,
      Thanks.
      I keep saying they're few left, and another one presents itself.

      Delete
  9. Replies
    1. Jim Yaussy Albright,
      Thanks.
      Mine also Jim.

      Delete
  10. Beautiful as usual Alan. Striking colors.

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    Replies
    1. Howard,
      Thanks.
      I appreciate it Howard.

      Delete
  11. Alan
    I am fast becoming a fan of the dead drift, which I assume you were using to that colorful brown. This day proved that the surrounding overtook the numbers brought to hand. That is one beautiful place you guys were fishing. Thanks for shairng

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    Replies
    1. Bill Trussell,
      Thanks.
      That's what I used. I am not a big fan of nymphs, and probably could have taken him on a dry.

      Delete
  12. I hear you about nymphing..in my experience is a synonym for snagging...I'm sure I've missed out on a lot of fish..great pics Alan..

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    Replies
    1. penbayman,
      Thanks.
      There's just something about a fish taking a fly off the surface that can't be beat.

      Delete