Friday, January 31, 2014

The "rusty old streamer"

Today is a day for a wonderful story. It's not one of mine but one of a fly fisher in Norway. Jan Olsen-Nauen is an angler, and bamboo fly rod maker. He has a blog, called "Bamboo Fly Rod" and that's where this story was told.

The winter had been some what mild and the opportunity presented itself to go fishing along the sea coast for sea trout. The gear was placed in the car and off I went. On arrival I assembled what was needed, reaching for my fly box I realized it was not there, but left behind on my kitchen table. I reached around the trunk of my car and found what was an old rusty streamer. The fly was pretty beat up, even the tinsel had changed color. Well I was here, and that streamer was all I had so I tied it on and hoped for the best.

The "rusty old streamer" did its thing. Several beautiful sea trout were caught and a few missed, probably because of the hooks poor condition. This story really touched me when I first read it. The simplicity of it is what makes it so wonderful, and it should be told again.





29 comments:

  1. Tis the simple that makes life bearable me thinks

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. John,
      Thanks.
      Me thinks you are right.

      Delete
  2. I've never owned a bamboo rod, but I do have my old Pflueger Medalist 1494! Classic rod and reel to go with an old streamer, who says the best things are new!

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    Replies
    1. Mark,
      Thanks.
      I to have my Medalist. I have it paired with a Cortland glass rod. First fly rod.
      You should check out Jan's blog.

      Delete
  3. Excellent story and the last photo really is just fantastic. Thanks for sharing.

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    1. Atlas,
      Thanks.
      When I read his story and saw the photos I was really taken.

      Delete
  4. Alan
    This story brings back the memory of my Dad's old beat up Pflueger Medalist reel, which he used until he couldn't fly fish anymore. The reel was paired with a Shakespeare glass Wonder Rod. He love to go after bluegill with the combo using a tiny round shape poppers. He is the one that taught me how to use the fly rod in my early teen years. As for the reel and rod, my brother gave it to my nephew. He has it framed. Thanks for sharing

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    Replies
    1. Bill Trussell,
      Thanks.
      That reel has touched many a fly fisher. In the day you could not find better.
      It's nice you have saved your dads rod and reel.

      Delete
    2. Hey Bill and Alan - I bought my Pfluger to match with my first decent fly rod which was also a Shakespeare Wonderglass Kwik Taper (7'6")! I am in the process of refinishing that rod now and hope to have it all fixed up before the end of winter

      Delete
  5. A good story for sure. I can remember an occasion just like it. I found a clouser in my boat when I left my tackle bag in the truck back at the ramp. Thank God i did not get into any blues. Great post. I really liked it.

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    Replies
    1. Savage,
      Thanks.
      With those fellows you need good solid stainless.

      Delete
  6. Nice share! As much as I love tying all kinds of cool flies that require tons of time and a dozen different materials, these simple flies flat out produce!

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    Replies
    1. Nick D,
      Thanks.
      Nick I'm the same. It's all about simplicity.
      There is "beauty" in simplicity.

      Delete
  7. That is definitely a great story! I've had those days where I arrive stream side only to discover I forgot my fly boxes. It seems there are always one or two flies floating around my car that will usually work in a pinch.

    Also, I always enjoy your pictures at the top of your blog but I think this one is one of my favorites. The stream is just begging for someone to fish it, but the fall colors are what really makes it a fantastic shot.

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    Replies
    1. David Knapp,
      Thanks.
      Most of us can generally find a fly or two around the car to make do.
      That stream was in northern New Hampshire. The day we were there we did not see a soul.

      Delete
  8. Wonderful story Alan. I had heard one similar some time ago and it struck me the same way.

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    Replies
    1. Howard,
      Thanks.
      There was that something about it.

      Delete
  9. Thanks! A good example of... less is more.

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    Replies
    1. Walt Franklin,
      Thanks.
      That's for sure.

      Delete
  10. History calls out to us when we see stories and pictures like these. Pflueger Medalists, Bamboo rods, simple streamer patterns, all great parts of history in fly fishing. I love tying simple flies. Tie more of them that way. If you lose one, it is quickly and easily replaced. Thanks for sharing.

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    Replies
    1. Mel Moore,
      Thanks.
      I never tire of them. Simplicity, it works.

      Delete
    2. Alan, take a look at my blog header and description. I have used your thought as my new blog caption.

      Delete
    3. Mel Moore,
      Those are great shots. I like the simplicity.

      Delete
  11. A great story and beautiful photos. Simplicity and making do will take you further than some would believe. How many would have got upset, left, and missed out on a good day?

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    Replies
    1. Bill,
      Thanks.
      Use what you have. Like you said it will usually do.

      Delete
  12. Alan
    great post, as always :)

    ahh...simplicity....some of us flyfishers have been guilty of using whats called ...Pellet-fly......
    a small piece of cork with just a hook thru it....that's it.....I keep it the Altoid tin along with my matches and license shhh....don't tell anyone!!
    just pure simplicity !!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. flyfisher1000,
      Thanks.
      Yes the "pellet fly", I've heard of it's accomplishments.
      Your secret is safe.

      Delete
  13. Hello, Brk Trt
    Thanks for sharing the little story.

    Best
    Jan

    ReplyDelete
  14. Hi, My name is Juan and i blog over at Breaking the bank. I was looking trough your blog and found this post. Something that caught my eye is that pfleuger reel. I have one that was gifted to me a while back. It looks exactly the same except the number on mine is 1595. I don't know a lot about it. I don't even know what weight reel it is? Any info you can share on it?

    ReplyDelete