Wednesday, May 21, 2014

"Brook Trout Forest"....all's well.

Yesterday morning I headed east over the Connecticut river. The sun was just on its way up and starting to show signs of a beautiful day. I continued to drive into the sun for some time, with coffee in place, and thoughts of the stream I was to fish this day. The stream is a true gem, and it's runs through woodlands of pine, hemlock and hardwood. At places it's a fast paced freestone, and others it's very placid. These waters get almost no visitors, that is angling visitors. Once I ran into a turkey hunter, and another a mountain biker. Solitude, kind of what I treasure most.

This stream is dark, sort of like a rich tea color. Its rocks and banks are lined with moss, and in places the streamside foliage is so thick it's almost impossible to fish. Then there are those wonderful sections where a backcast will not get tangled in the trees. But the true treasure of these waters are the wild brook trout that call it home. These brook trout are by far the darkest I've seen any where in Connecticut. Some of them are almost black. These native char have adapted well to there home.

Like brook trout everywhere they are always hungry and fly choice is not a major process. They do like a bit of color to the flies and yellow seems to be one of them. Come spend a day with me as I fish the stream in a place I call "brook trout forest".



A yellow winged Picket Pin. A dark brook trout.


Behind these rocks, in the deeper runs a streamer fished with a little speed can bring hard responses.


They say a picture is worth a 1000 words. Well this one has that but still lacks the true beauty of these special fish. Black, blue, red, a deep orange, green,....it gos on and on.






These guys kept me busy this day, so busy I did not mind the biting bugs about.




The stream with it's dark waters was a crisp 56 degrees.


To take fish like such after the brutal winter we experienced is tribute to the tenacity for life they posses. All is well in "brook trout forest".




CLICK IMAGES TO ENLARGE

34 comments:

  1. That's my kind of fly. Nice and simple and will break the surface tension quickly when it lands. That way it "goes to work" immediately. *S*

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Peter F.
      Thanks.
      That it is, and that it did.

      Delete
  2. Lovely post and pictures as always! That last fly looks interesting, kind of like a Mickey Finn. Is that a variation of yours?

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    Replies
    1. Mark,
      Thanks.
      It's sort of a sparse soft hackle Mickey Finn. It's one of my variations.

      Delete
  3. Awesome post - thanks for taking us along with you!

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    Replies
    1. Hibernation,
      Thanks.
      Will it's my pleasure.

      Delete
  4. Alan
    Of all the streams you have fished this one has got to be my favorite. The sheer beauty of this place would replace the excitement of landing a brook trout, and that is saying a lot considering how colorful these fish are. Thanks for sharing

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    Replies
    1. Bill Trussell,
      Thanks.
      It's one of my favorites also. Like I've said many times it's the places wher we fish that can be as rewarding as the fish we catch.

      Delete
  5. it is so lush and so beautiful. the water over those rocks!

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    Replies
    1. TexWisGirl,
      Thanks.
      I did a small video clip of this stream, the sounds will put one in a trance.

      Delete
  6. Excellent post. Well Done!! Good Stuff! Awesome pictures!

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    Replies
    1. TROUT1,
      Thanks.
      Pete I take it you like it.

      Delete
  7. East of the Ct is my favorite. (OK I'm bias) Brook trout forest is a term me and a friend picked up from you, and have been using it to refer to slow pressure streams that we enjoy. Fish on!

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    Replies
    1. Swamp Yankee,
      Thanks.
      Eastern CT is fine with me, nice country. Brook Trout Forest is a wonderful book written by Kathy Scott.

      Delete
  8. Alan, yellow is a favorite color down here as well and you're right about how dark those fish are. The only place I've caught brookies anywhere close in terms of color was in Shenandoah National Park. Thanks for sharing a great trip!

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    Replies
    1. David Knapp,
      Thanks.
      Yellow a brookie magnet. Shenandoah, have to fish there one day.

      Delete
  9. Good stuff Alan...just what I needed to take my mind out of this cubicle I call home 5 days a week.

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    Replies
    1. HighPlainsFlyFisher,
      Thanks.
      I know this feeling you have, I want to fish, ah s@&t I have to work. Nice long weekend coming.

      Delete
  10. That is an absolutely beautiful stream and the picture of the star flower is very cool. And those are s ome very dark brookies but they are gorgeous just the same.

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    Replies
    1. Kiwi,
      Thanks.
      It's a piece of heaven. I only know of two streams I fish that have those dark brookies.

      Delete
  11. Replies
    1. Michael Curry,
      Thanks.
      I appreciate the comment.

      Delete
  12. As pretty as the water and surrounding area is, as pretty as the brookies are, your photography is superb!

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    Replies
    1. Howard,
      Thanks.
      I just found another function, it takes video.

      Delete
  13. Incredibly beautiful Brookies. The markings are stunning! What can a fellow say about the scenery other than I am so happy you took me along on this trip.

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    Replies
    1. Mel Moore,
      Thanks.
      Isn't this computer stuff great. We can fish together 2000 miles apart.
      Love to take you there in person though.

      Delete
  14. Great post, thanks for sharing.

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    Replies
    1. brian,
      Thanks.
      It's my pleasure friend.

      Delete
  15. Like holding Spring in your hand. Beautiful images of a beautiful place.

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    Replies
    1. Jim Yaussy Albright,
      Thanks.
      A fine choice of words Jim.

      Delete
  16. The stream and fish appear to be in good shape. If only winter would eliminate the mosquito population.

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    Replies
    1. RKM,
      Thanks.
      The skeeters were nasty for sure. It seemed they were at their worse around 10am. Some Cutter took care of them.

      Delete
  17. Glad you had fun on my side of the river.

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    Replies
    1. RM Lytle,
      Thanks.
      I venture into the east quite often. Love the quiet corner.

      Delete