Saturday, September 20, 2014

Red Brook, Salters Sept 2014 part 1

Just got back from three beautiful days on Cape Cod. The weather was gorgeous, sunny days with temps in the 60's and the nights were oh so refreshingly cool. As we were driving we noticed the leaves starting to show some color, in fact in the town of Foxboro it almost looked like mid October. As we closed in on Buzzards Bay the foliage was not the same. While there was a splash of color here and there it was quite a bit behind areas further west and north.

Cape Cod is a Mecca for salt water anglers and this is the season of early migration of striped bass and bluefish. The bays and the seacoast draw anglers in search of these big fellows. Well this angler is drawn to another semi salt water fish, one that lives in the salty bay and is also at home in the small fresh water stream known as Red Brook. I found the stream in pristine condition. The tide had been going out for some time and the first run-pool I fished was in tide water. Several casts were made, the streamer fly working perfectly. On one of the swings the fly was absolutely smashed. A second later the fish was on and what a fish it was. I finally got control and as I brought the fish close I was shocked at what was there. Looking into the water I saw a perfect specimen of a wild salter brook trout. A heavy fish of about 14 inches. His color was showing signs of a male at this time of year. Jeanette who was standing on the bridge watching, commented that's a nice one. I placed the net into the water to lift the fish out when he suddenly broke for open water. I thought the streamer was still in his lip but it was not. This was a great way to start your day even if your catch eluded you.


Moving upstream the brook took on the look of a spring creek. Bright clear water with lots of watercress and other vegetation. The water temps were a constant 48-50 degrees. I saw no signs of insect activity, which is not uncommon for me...I never see insects here, but none the less I know there are brook trout here.


Though it may look like a weedy jungle there are clear cut channels of water. These channels are where you want to work your streamer. The brook trout hold in the undercuts and under the the vegetation and will strike with swift authority when it darts by. Many hits and many hookups happen but it's tough bringing one to hand.


A true gift. Wild salter brook trout. The Mickey Finn was to much to let pass. This guy was taken from the pool pictured above, under the tree branch to the right in the photo. The stream depth here is thigh deep and over the days gave up some nice trout.


I had one or two brookies take a blaze orange wet fly. They like those colors.




The fly box. I could have brought four patterns with me and had more than enough. Streamers are key.


I fished mornings and late afternoon with the latter being best as far as hits are concerned.


More Red Brook in part two.



26 comments:

  1. Welcome home. Looks like you found the beauty you were seeking.

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    Replies
    1. Jim Yaussy Albright,
      Thanks.
      For sure Jim.

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  2. Replies
    1. TROUT1,
      Thanks.
      Pete it was a fine few days.

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  3. Nice! To find brookies in the brackish spring flow looks to be both challenging and rewarding.

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    Replies
    1. rivertoprambles,
      Thanks.
      Walt those brookies are remarkable. Their home is equal.

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  4. Replies
    1. tenkara ambassador,
      Thanks.
      As the song says "your sure to fall in love with old Cape Cod"

      Delete
  5. Beautiful! I have to go there some day.

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    Replies
    1. RKM,
      Thanks.
      Kirk you must add that place to your list.
      Perhaps November.

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  6. Replies
    1. TexWisGirl,
      Thanks.
      That it is Teresa.

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  7. Replies
    1. Apache Trout,
      Thanks.
      John maybe we could fish it together in Nov, or early Dec.

      Delete
  8. Stunning pictures Alan. Welcome home!

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    Replies
    1. Howard,
      Thanks.
      It's nice to visit, and so nice to come home.

      Delete
  9. Brookies from spring creeks like that are true trophies. They are sometimes very difficult to catch.....that's especially true of the ones here on Long Island.

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    Replies
    1. Kiwi,
      Thanks.
      Very true Chris.
      I have found that low light and shadows will aid in success. These fish have survived by being extremely cautious.

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  10. Wow, Salty Brookies! Beautiful they are. I am amazed at the quality of the water in that little stream. As always, sure appreciate you sharing your part of the country and your beautiful fish.

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    Replies
    1. Mel Moore,
      Thanks.
      A lot of volunteer man hours went into the restoration of that little stream. I for one am truly grateful for their efforts.

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  11. Fantastic, Alan! I live relatively close to this water, and have yet to make it a destination. Thank you for sharing this beautiful New England treasure with us and giving me the motivation to make a trip to these waters.

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    Replies
    1. Gin Clear,
      Thanks.
      If you do go I know you will not be sorry. A beautiful peaceful place.

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  12. Good stuff as usual. I will get there one day!

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    Replies
    1. Kierran Broatch,
      Thanks.
      I hope it's soon friend.

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  13. Alan
    What a beautiful place to land brook trout; were you using your waders or walking the banks? I am really impressed with the fly box, and the variety of streamers you are using. Are a lot of those streamers from your own pattern creation? Thanks for sharing a great post!!

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    Replies
    1. Bill Trussell,
      Thanks.
      Bill I wear waders but only to cross the stream. Most of the fishing is from the banks. There are a few named patterns such as the Black Ghost, Montreal Whore, Mickey Finn and Edson Tiger. The others are my patterns using mallard feathers. Streamers work very well on that stream.

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