Wednesday, September 10, 2014

"The Fisherman"

"in their simplest form".....that is part of the subtitle of this blog. It has been my way of fishing from the start and is still the way I do it.

I had tied up some flies last week and was anxious to give them a try. I had planned on fishing them entirely leaving my trusted flies in the box. I arrived at the river and geared up. The fly on the the tippet was the fly I fished last, an elk hair caddis and that was the fly I fished first. The caddis was given ample time to bring some action but failed. Flies were changed, and changed again but the result was the same and although a strike or two occurred I felt it was not happening.

While fishing I took notice of an angler close by who was apparently watching me for some time. The angler was not your typical fisher in both looks and garb but one who has had some success in catching his share.

The look on the fishers face told me that I need to simplify and that all would be well. Looking into the fly box I selected one of the soft hackles I had tied. The light came on and I tied on one of the flies.

Now I'm not going to tell you that I fooled every trout in the river that day, but I will tell you this the day was indeed fruitful. The pure simplicity of these flies is what make them so appealing both to fish and fly fisher.







As I brought my third trout to hand that morning my angler friend seemed to have a smile on his face..."simplicity"....



37 comments:

  1. Way to go with those soft hackles. The other night I was out on the Farmington and shared a favorite spot with one of "the Fisherman" 's relative. It just sat quietly watching me on the opposite bank.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Mark,
      Thanks.
      They really are awesome birds. We have them visit the pond at our condo and the amount of fish they catch is unbelievable.

      Delete
  2. I really like those second soft hackles....nice ties Brk Trt! I had an experience with a great blue heron on a small mountain stream a couple of years back. It was unique but I was definitely taken back by seeing one so deep in the woods. I'm used to seeing them along the Hudson or in and around the bays and salt water marshes here on Long Island. Great pictures.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Christopher Kuhlow,
      Thanks.
      They're wonderful flies to tie, real enjoyable. I've seen them work a few small streams, and if you want to find spawning trout just look for heron sign.

      Delete
  3. It is indeed the simple things that keep me sane.....well as close to sanity as I'm likely to get that is!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. John Wooldridge,
      Thanks.
      That it does my man.

      Delete
  4. Love it. The simplest fisherman around for sure is that fellow in your images. His advice, clearly helped!

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    Replies
    1. Hibernation,
      Thanks.
      Will he did have the skills to give lessons on how to catch fish with ease.

      Delete
  5. Replies
    1. TexWisGirl,
      Thanks.
      Teresa I figured you would.

      Delete
  6. Kudos, Alan, on the new Soft Hackles. They would appear to be a big hit............................................................
    I get nervous when another "fisher" stops what they are doing and pays attention to what I am doing.
    Guess I shouldn't be so non-simple at times.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. pondstalkerblog,
      Thanks.
      The feathered and furry anglers are OK, it's the ones out of the Orvis catalog that I worry about.

      Delete
  7. At least he hasn't gotten to the point of being renamed FISH THIEF, yet.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Mark Kautz,
      Thanks.
      Not officially Mark, but there are those who consider him to be.

      Delete
  8. Replies
    1. ssj,
      Thanks.
      They do work, and work well.

      Delete
  9. It makes me smile when I see talk of Soft Hackles being "new" T E Pritt and Edmonds and Lee were recording these patterns in the 1800s there is a book called North Country flies from the 1880s if you can get a copy you will find it fascinating. Also Brook and river trouting from 1916 by Edmonds and Lee . They are both wonderful reading and still relevent today,

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Andy,
      Thanks.
      The flies are not new by a long shot. They have wonderful histories. But what's "new" is the fact that so many have not fished them. Most fly shops carry 2 maybe 3 patterns compared to the countless other types of flies.

      Delete
    2. Same trouble over here although there are a few specialist suppliers who will supply all the traditional patterns . I must admit when I am fishing the Yorkshire Ure sometimes I do wonder if I am fishing in the exact footsteps of those names from the past. Have you read The Practical Angler or the Art of Trout Fishing More Particularly Applied to Clear Water by W C Stewart. Its a fascinating book

      Delete
    3. Andy,
      It's a nice feeling to fish those storied waters. Taking pause to hear the voices of those who have fished here in times past.
      I have not read this book, I'll check our local library.

      Delete
  10. Very true Alan, I know myself that my most used patterns tend to be simple ties.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. brian,
      Thanks.
      Agreed. Natural insects are not complicated, so why should the ones we tie.

      Delete
  11. AL, The "fisherman" was probably scoping out your catch as you released them!!! Soft Hackles. Love em. Game Saver some days especially the BH PT SH!!!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. TROUT1,
      Thanks.
      Pete he may have been doing just that.
      I'm fully aware of your fancy of this fly, and I have seen what it can do in your hand. Game saver for sure.

      Delete
  12. Simple is right! Beautiful flies! Thanks for sharing.

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    Replies
    1. Michael Curry,
      Thanks.
      Yes it is Mike. Makes you wonder why we still tie complicated flies.

      Delete
  13. Terrific photos of moon, heron, flies. Thanks for the viewing.

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    Replies
    1. rivertoprambles,
      Thanks.
      That heron was so cool. He showed several expressions while I fished.

      Delete
  14. Beautiful. You were able to learn again from a master.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Jim Yaussy Albright,
      Thanks.
      Jim, that guy can fish.

      Delete
  15. Alan
    Some days its good to have a little competition----love the soft hackles patterns--thanks for sharing

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Bill Trussell,
      Thanks.
      For sure as long as they don't tell where the action is.

      Delete
  16. I've never fished soft hackle flies like these, but I have read numerous amount of things that say they produce. Beautiful flies, for being so simple. Great shots of your new winged friend, too!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Justin Carfagnini,
      Thanks.
      Get yourself some and give them a fair shot. I think you'll like the results.
      He was very photogenic.

      Delete
  17. Your friend still looks like he could use a couple of extra meals but his bait wasn't as pretty as yours.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Howard Levett,
      Thanks.
      He does appear to be a tad on the thin side, perhaps that's why he watched me for so long.

      Delete
  18. Alan, is your book still available for purchase? Please send me an email at windknots1949@gmail.com

    ReplyDelete