Friday, October 10, 2014

An October Small Stream

It was a fine October morning as I set out to fish a little stream. The sun was already up and doing its best to highlight the color scheme that nature was unfolding. The air was crisp with a slight breeze. The stream was glistening in the sunlight and the red maple leaves floating downstream stood brilliant.

This stream has always been brook trout water. When your fly was taken you could bet your rod it was a brookie. The last few years have seen changes here and more and more browns have been showing up in the mix. There are those who would say that's not good, and they should be stopped. Maybe so but I believe that the stopping of the brown should have taken place in the 1800's. The fact is that they are here and they are wild. I only hope in this stream the brook trout and the brown can live together.


While Autumns flora may not show the vibrant colors of Spring and Summer, it does have that sparkle.


Even in its dead rotting state there is some beauty.


In this section I cast my fly. I watched it move through the riffles and catch itself on a leaf that was floating down. I lifted the fly up and shook the leaf back into the water. Casting again, the fly passing along the riffle suddenly went missing. I set the hook and this time it was not a leaf.


The beautiful wild brown was at hand. Its dark body with vibrant red spots encircled with blue halos and black spots that were not to be outdone. It's fins were large and the tail seem to show the power of this fish. I placed the brown into the stream and watched it swim away.

It is here that I sat after the release and poured myself a cup of coffee. As I was drinking I observed what appeared to be a rising fish. That's not really uncommon accept it was taking place in a fast riffled section of water. It took me a few minutes to finish my coffee, and in this time the fish continued to rise. I tied on a Adams parachute and drifted towards the rising fish. As it neared the the spot a splash occurred and soon a second brown was at hand.

The brown was a mini carbon copy of the brown I had taken only minutes before. What a day.


CLICK IMAGES TO ENLARGE

24 comments:

  1. Thanks for reminding me that I need to get out on a small stream soon! I am hoping that we get some rain decent rain, the smaller streams look very low these days

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Mark,
      Thanks.
      They are indeed low, but can be fished. I had to take my time and work slowly, even then I spooked more than I was able to fool. Some rain forecasted and it all helps.

      Delete
  2. Although they're beautiful, I sure hope those browns don't crowd out those brookies!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. RI brook trout,
      Thanks.
      I don't want that to happen either. And I think they can coexist.

      Delete
  3. Big Brown for such slim water. Once again, beautiful country.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Mark Kautz,
      Thanks.
      I caught one a bit larger further up the stream. They eat lots of dace which this stream is full of.

      Delete
  4. Replies
    1. TexWisGirl,
      Thanks.
      Your quite welcome.

      Delete
  5. A fine October day, thanks for sharing with us.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. brian,
      Thanks.
      Hopefully one of many.

      Delete
  6. Amazing to find such browns in a stream that tiny.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. RM Lytle,
      Thanks.
      The stream is a bit skimpy now, but there are some deep pools and undercuts. With some rain it will be fine.

      Delete
  7. Nicely stated, and a stately Brown to go with it. Pure October.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Jim Yaussy Albright,
      Thanks.
      Stately indeed. October has been good.

      Delete
  8. You see, Alan, this is why I come to your blog as often as I have the time for. Always something beautiful to look at followed up with a dream sometime about being at your side. Probably never happen, but, a man can dream can't they?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Mel Moore,
      Thanks.
      You can never tell. And dreaming is a big part of angling.

      Delete
  9. Though I would think we both agree that brookies are by far the prettiest, the browns have their own pros and are a miracle of evolution in their own right (whether they should be there or not). As long as they don't overrun the natural order a little bit of variety can be nice.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Kiwi,
      Thanks.
      I to enjoy the variety also. And I do accept the fact that brown trout are here and are not leaving. I just wish the brook trout were a little tougher at holding their ground.

      Delete
  10. Alan...

    wild browns are something to brag about.....they wont hurt the brookie population until they get huge.........ive always witnest that they co-inside with each other perfectly..theres NO 2 better fish than those..imho (in my honest opinion)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. flyfisher1000,
      Thanks.
      As long as the trout are wild they are OK by me. The brown in the post has eaten a small brookie or two in his day.

      Delete
  11. Replies
    1. Howard,
      Thanks.
      Love everything about this season.

      Delete
  12. A tiny flow of water can contain so much treasure...

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. penbayman,
      Thanks.
      Mike that's why I fish them. You never know.

      Delete