Monday, November 24, 2014

A cold stream, and a welcomed thaw. 11-23-14

After last weeks very cold conditions here in New England we were offered a break. Sunday and Monday will show a moderating trend in temperatures with Sunday perhaps being the better of the two days. Knowing this thanks to the confidence I put in our local weather forecasters I headed for a nice little stream to get my first glimpse of three days worth of cold temps and what they will do to the stream.

I am always amazed at the beauty of ice and how it forms on rocks as it flows. The thick formations and those delicate crepe like formations that seem to glitter so brightly that they must be viewed with sun glasses.

I started fishing those small dry flies again, what the heck they worked so well my last time out. It did not take to long to realize that they would not do the same on this outing. The water had become much colder and the fish were staying close to the bottom.

Into the box I gazed and picked up a beadhead soft hackle. I tied it on and it did the trick. A sudden strike and a brookie to hand. Moving upstream and casting I soon felt the bottom. I tried to free the fly but it was lost. Then the light came on. I had tied some of the flies with tungsten beads, they drop to bottom quickly which was not needed in this stream. Some of the others were tied with regular beads. Being both the same color I had to try to figure out which was which. Well I did and after that the fishing was easier and lest costly in terms of loosing the fly.


In this smooth deep pool I cast the fly and watched it sink. I could almost feel it bounce on the rocks below. As the fly finished the drift I started to work it back. I retrieved with an up and down motion like you would a jig. Suddenly I felt the strike and then it was fish on.




I knew from the weight of the fish it was a good one. As the rod worked the fish closer I could see just how big he was. I laid my hand under the trout and lifted him up. He was beautiful. A quick photo and off he went. This was by far the largest brook trout I've ever taken from this stream.


These are the beadhead soft hackles. Can you tell which one is the tungsten bead? Can you tell which is the veteran of the outing?


Catching fish is the reason to be out here....or is it. While a brook trout to hand is wonderful there is "so much more to it" this small stream angling.




A friend along the way.



25 comments:

  1. Nice to see someone taking advantage of the break in the cold. Yesterday actually felt warm. I hope the warm rain we are getting will bring some new life in the days ahead.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Mark,
      Thanks.
      I think Tuesday should be an awesome fishing day. Hope you can get out.

      Delete
  2. Looks like a great little outing Alan. We have to take advantage of these nicer days as they present themselves because they're going to get fewer and farther between in the coming days.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. HighPlainsFlyFisher,
      Thanks.
      Jeff it was indeed. And your right on about those unpredictable days ahead.

      Delete
  3. All the Tungsten beads I have are a dull gray. Makes is a bit easier to distinguish.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Mark Kautz,
      Thanks.
      Mine are of the same gold color. I purchased them at Bass Pro Shop.
      I have a solution though.

      Delete
  4. i love the reflections of the trees in the water surrounding your hand holding your catch. awesome!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. TexWisGirl,
      Thanks.
      Teresa you don't realize what the camera catches until its published.

      Delete
  5. I, too, love the reflection of the trees in that capture. That brookie is big and beautiful! Very nice post, I always enjoy your photographs.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Justin Carfagnini,
      Thanks.
      Something for us all. The camera deserves most of the credit Justin.

      Delete
  6. I too got out yesterday in MA, but not as lucky as your day, Alan. That large brookie is beautiful!! I'm guessing the lower fly is the veteran and hence the non-tungsten bead.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Gin Clear,
      Thanks.
      Dean at least you were able to get out. The lower one it is.

      Delete
  7. You definitely have a knack for finding the big boys out of these little streams.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. RM Lytle,
      Thanks.
      It's the other way around buddy.....the brook trout find me.

      Delete
  8. That's a beauty Alan, love the ice pictures too.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. brian,
      Thanks.
      That ice is so special. It shines and glimmers in the sun....almost magical.

      Delete
  9. Once again, thanks for taking us along Alan. Beautiful!

    ReplyDelete
  10. The picture with the ice coming down off the rock is amazing. That is quite a good sized male you have there, and he should only get fatter as he recovers from the spawn.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. RI brook trout,
      Thanks.
      It's beautiful, but caution is needed. The rocks can be a place for an injury.
      He should be awesome in a few weeks.

      Delete
  11. What a fish! Good job on a cold stream.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Jim Yaussy Albright,
      Thanks.
      Changing conditions...changing tactics.

      Delete
  12. Alan, what a fish that larger brookie is! What size were the soft hackles you were using? I was pretty intrigued to hear that you were working the fly and not just letting it dead-drift... Love that!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Klags,
      Thanks.
      They were a size 14. I did fish the nymph on a dead drift but I change the style at times. Sometimes it works.

      Delete
  13. The "it" of it..it's hard to put your finger on "it" but you sum "it" up pretty well Alan..

    ReplyDelete