Sunday, December 7, 2014

Iridescence

Many materials used in the craft of tying flies have an iridescence to them that will attract fish to the flies tied with these materials. Above are a few natural materials that hold a special iridescence that I like to call "spice". Each of the materials, which are a pheasant tail, peacock herl, and starling contain some very fine examples of fine and detailed iridescence.

While the flash of a man made material such as tinsel, crystal flash and others contain many attributes and do indeed help catch fish, I believe that flies that incorporate the three natural materials above do a far better job. I have never observed a trout from underwater and the way he views his world. But a fly that can reflect various light conditions in a subtle and moving way will more likely bring a strike.

Below are examples of soft hackle flies using all of the materials above. If you look closely you can see each ones special "spice"..."iridescence" that will garner attention.

The facets of light being caught in tails and body. The material is pheasant tail. The same delicate light can be seen in the peacock herl thorax, as well in the beautiful feathers of a starling soft hackle collar. While the use of these natural materials will make a "best fly" they will indeed aid you in the ability to catch more fish.



14 comments:

  1. Alan, seems to me that the natural iridescensce has a closer connection to the spirit of the life that was, and maybe that has something to do with our preference for it over the man-made. Very nice ties.

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    Replies
    1. rivertoprambles,
      Thanks.
      Walt I like your perspective.

      Delete
  2. Those are some wonderful materials and the soft hackled pheasant tail in its many variations is always a winner.

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    Replies
    1. Mark,
      Thanks.
      It sure has proved itself to this angler.

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  3. Replies
    1. TexWisGirl,
      Thanks.
      Teresa now there's a new take.

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  4. Those are magnificent in the truest sense of the word.

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    Replies
    1. Michael Curry,
      Thanks.
      I appreciate it Mike.

      Delete
  5. Beautiful flies Alan. I like to use those materials as well.

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    Replies
    1. Howard,
      Thanks.
      I guess they work where ever there are trout.

      Delete
  6. I'd have a hard time calling those wet flies and not nymphs ;). They are very beautiful though. Where did you acquire the starling? It has more color than most I have seen.

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    1. RM Lytle,
      Thanks.
      Come on what's a little stretch.
      The starling was purchased at Upcountry fly shop in New Hartford.

      Delete
  7. I just wanted to add something that you already know, I am sure. There is "something" about a combination of Pheasant Tail and Peacock in combination on a fly pattern that just makes trout go out of their mind on many occasions. Oh, yeah, it's the iridescense...................................... Well done, Alan, well done!

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    Replies
    1. Mel,
      Thanks.
      Very true buddy.
      I use peacock in a lot of my flies. Believe it or not I just started using the pheasant tail recently.

      Delete