Sunday, March 8, 2015

The "Cinberg"

Back in January I did a post on a fly pattern, it was a soft hackled dry fly. When I first saw the fly on a website I thought "wow" this has got to be something new. Further research into this pattern showed that these flies have been around for some time. The English have been tying these flies and in the United States these flies have been a staple in some areas. January 20, 2015 was the first knowledge of these flies by this angler.

The English pattern that I wrote of back in January is called a "Jingler". It's tied with a thread body, and cock hackle then partridge soft hackle. Some are tied with a tail, but it is not necessary.

This is the American version of a similar fly, called a "Cinberg". The fly was created by Dr. Bernard Cinberg of New York. The doctor practiced in New York City and had a summer home in the Catskills near the Neversink River. Sometime in the 1930's this fly was first tied and fished. It was a success, especially with the brook trout. The fly was also mentioned by the late Datus Proper in his book "What The Trout Said". His reference to a fly he called a "bent hackle" fly told of the fly still being fished.

The "Cinberg"
Well I sat down at the vise and attempted to tie the Cinberg. It's basic components are pretty simple. A dry fly hook, some colored thread for the body, Coq de Leon for the tail, brown dry fly hackle, and wood duck for the soft hackle collar. The only problem is in working with the wood duck feather. Because the wood duck can't be wound on, like a traditional soft hackle, like a partridge or grouse.

When completed the fly looks pretty good, considering there are feathers going every which way. The fly looks like an insect no matter which way it may land on the water.

From the photos you can see a wonderful buggy looking dry fly.




"Cinberg" Dark Version
This photo shows the Cinberg as it would light on the water. The cock hackle giving support, and the thin barred legs from the wood duck looking like the legs of an insect.



20 comments:

  1. Replies
    1. Apache Trout,
      Thanks.
      I love researching and then trying to duplicate those old patterns.

      Delete
  2. Alan
    Very nice, what size is use the most in this pattern? Thanks for sharing

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Bill Trussell,
      Thanks.
      Bill these are tied on size 14 hooks. I believe 12 and even 10 would be good.

      Delete
  3. Man, I wish I had your fly tying talent.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Mark Kautz,
      Thanks.
      I appreciate that Mark.

      Delete
  4. What Mark said. I really enjoy tying but don't possess the skills or patience.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Howard Levett,
      Thanks.
      Howard your a fisherman, so you have patience. Your quite a writer, so you indeed have skill.
      Just a matter of time.

      Delete
  5. I have to agree with both Mark and Howard here. What beautiful work! I don't mind fly tying at all and have my favorite patterns to tie. However, I don't like to tie dry flies like this one. Because, I am just not much good at it and it ends up stressing me out. So I tie other flies that I am comfortable with.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Mel,
      Thanks.
      Most times I prefer tying patterns I fish and those are what matter most. I try not to complicate things and that is one of the ways I avoid frustration. My friend I'm sure over the years you have tied a few flies and know what's best.

      Delete
  6. Alan,
    It's a beauty! I've always wondered how duck was "hackled". It creates a really unique effect!
    Will

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hibernation,
      Thanks.
      Will it is quite tricky, and some what of a pain. I think that why you don't see this pattern in the fly shops.

      Delete
  7. Great pattern, I do have a question though. How did you put your duck hackle on since you can't wrap it like hackle, and I am assuming you put it on first then the hackle? Wouldn't mind tying a couple up for myself!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Luke Bothell,
      Thanks.
      Luke your right. The duck is tied on first then the hackle. The duck feather is then uprighted by the use of a half hitch tool. A tip....when tying in the duck hackle try to spin it like you would deer hair.

      Delete
  8. Ahh make sense! Thank you very much, in a hotel all week and I always carry my material. That will make tying some up much easier thanks again!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Luke,
      Have fun. Let me know how they come out.

      Delete
  9. Really like the buggy look of this fly shown in the last picture. This should definitely be a producer
    producer, and I can't wait to see how you fare with it.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. RI brook trout,
      Thanks.
      Never tied this pattern before, but it looks to be a fish taker.

      Delete
  10. Looks like an awesome fly Brk Trt..well done..

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. penbayman,
      Thanks.
      Mike if only the trout feel the same, I'll be in good shape.

      Delete