Saturday, September 5, 2015

The Soft Pocket

Yesterday Mark and I fished the Farmington River. This will not be an angling report but some of my thoughts on what took place in a very beautiful river. To some this river is the most hostile place in the world, and to survive in it is a challenge that I cannot even imagine.

I was fishing a very fast and heavy current. The water was so badly broken up that if a fish were there I would be shocked. Just to the left of that water roller coaster was a soft pocket about 8 feet long and 5 feet wide. The water was flowing towards a bush and a small undercut. This would be an ideal place for a large trout who had negotiated the heavy current to pull into and just sit and rest before continuing his move upstream. I had rigged my line with a small bead head soft hackle with a wet fly tied to the hook bend of the bead head. I made several casts into this soft spot and let the flies tumble down easily through the pocket. As I worked the flies back and was in the process of lifting them out of the water to make another cast, I noticed a very subtle movement behind the last fly. I again cast the flies out and again they found the soft spot. I let the flies sit, I believe they were on the bottom. A moment later I started my retrieve, suddenly I felt the pull of a fish. Seconds later I was looking in the water at a most precious sight.
What lay there was a very youthful wild brown trout. I was amazed at such beauty, and such tenacity to exist in such a hostile river. Fish this size are on most browns in this river what's for dinner saying. I took a quick photo and let it back into the river. Later in the day while enjoying a cup of coffee on the deck, the image of that brown popped into my head. I said quietly to myself the natural world is wonderful, "I hope you make it little friend"



14 comments:

  1. sweet post of respect for the fighters. :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. TexWisGirl
      Thanks
      Theresa fighters they are.

      Delete
  2. I hope he does too. I bet in three or four years he will be a beautiful beast.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. RM Lytle
      Thanks
      Rowan in that river with it's food sources three years from now he will be formidable.

      Delete
  3. Replies
    1. riverwalker34
      Thanks
      I appreciate your comment.

      Delete
  4. The variety, beautiful and tenacity of life is what led me into biology as a career. This post is just another example why I made the right choice.

    ReplyDelete
  5. My guess is that little guy made it and will grow to reproduce more tough little guys. Beautiful!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Howard Levett
      Thanks
      Howard that's exactly how I hope it plays out.

      Delete
  6. Alan
    This post is one of the main reason I blog to learn as much as I can about fishing tailraces. I assume the Farmington is a pressured tailrace just as my Sipsey is here? You can bet I will use this technique on the Sipsey next week. thanks for sharing

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Bill Trussell
      Thanks
      Bill the Farmington is certainly pressured, and those fish can frustrate. Sometimes a very unusual fly or an unusual presentation will bring good results.

      Delete
  7. Replies
    1. penbayman
      Thanks
      Mike so true, but hopefully in a couple years he will break a rod.

      Delete