Friday, October 30, 2015

How to kill a salter stream

This is very upsetting. There are fingerprints here and persons need to be held accountable.


How to kill a salter stream

14 comments:

  1. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  2. I used profanity in my original post, so I will repost. I will leave it as something like this makes me sick. You know the state can stock this stream at some point, but they will never be able to reproduce the genetics in the trout in this stream. Same as when they tried to get Atlantic salmon to go up the Connecticut River again. Turns out the extirpated originals were a special breed. Such a shame.

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    1. You are exactly right. Each stream's brook trout are genetically unique and are adapted to survive in that specific stream and now that has been lost. The stream can be restocked with trout from one of the two remaining local salter streams once the reason behind the extirpation is addressed, but this just further lessens the genetic diversity of the Cape's salters.

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    2. To my mind, it is inexcusable that the DEP in Massachusetts let this happen. Shouldn't preventing something like this be their number one priority? What happened here is outrageous.

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  3. I read Warren's FB post. Simply saddening. Our state agencies need to start enforcing regulations during drought or valuable ecosystems like the santuit will continue to be lost. It is unacceptable that there wasn't enough funding allocated for Steve Hurley to be available to visit this stream more often. Guess the state is too worried about funding its stocking programs for the catch and keep crowd. Just sickening. There needs to be a huge shift in mindset in the northeast if we want to retain our brook trout populations. I am going to do my best to help make that shift happen.

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  4. Anger and sadness can't fully express my reaction. Classic case of how we need to fish, monitor, work, and inform people who ostensibly are here to care for our natural resources.

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  5. What a waste of natural resources!! Human beings are supposed to be the most intelligent form of life on this planet and yet you would not know it after reading this article.

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  6. Thanks Alan - good to see this being shared so widely thanks to you and others that syndicate your feed.

    If anyone has any questions, please ask them on the SRBTC blog page.

    Geof Day

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  7. Alan
    You wonder sometimes how some fisheries survive when other fade away, this is a prime example. thanks for sharing

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  8. Horrible to read. It makes you eternally grateful for the beautiful and amazing streams that still support wild trout... Many in places that appear at first glance to have no "right" to hold those fish... but they continue.

    Hopefully something can be done to help this stream... and hopefully there are a fish or two left who could help...

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  9. Sad. One of the surest ways to kill a native trout stream that I've seen first hand is to put in a new development with road names like Trout Brook Court.

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