Friday, November 6, 2015

"Sea-Run brook trout...11-2015 part 1

"Red Brook" photo courtesy of Jeanette Petrucci
Did I ever tell you about the brook trout streams of southeast Massachusetts and Cape Cod, perhaps in a post or twenty. We returned from a few days of fishing for some of New England's most special natives. They are the sea-run or "salter" brook trout that inhabit several of the coastal streams in the area. And I wish to tell you of some of the pleasure we found in being able to fish for these brook trout.

The weather could not have been better for the first week of November. We were blessed with sunny skies mild temperatures and a touch of color that seemed to be hanging on. As usual we found some trout willing to take a streamer and a few special moments were caught of salter brook trout actually spawning. Both Jeanette and I agreed it was the highlight of our trip.


I know it looks tight but actually it was not bad and I could present the fly pretty easily.



I tangled with some incredibly strong brook trout. These fish were smart in their habitat and used it to avoid capture. I was graced by a few to hand.


My type of path....soft pine needles a a bit of sand. Easy walking in beautiful surroundings.


We found a deer trail through some thick woods that led us to some very productive water.


This wild jewel along with three others were taken from a ten yard stretch of stream.


"Take a break"....there is no better place. More on this adventure in my next post.



46 comments:

  1. Those are some gorgeous brookies! Nice job.

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    1. Chris "Kiwi" Kuhlow
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      Chris they are indeed. One day I must try those Long Island streams.

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  2. Alan
    The beauty of this place can only be described by framing all your images in this post; starting with the header image and the Red Brook image next!!! I can see where those healthy brook trout could give your combo quite a workout. Were you using the Hornberg streamers to land the brookies? Were you dead drifting the streamer or working it across the current? Great Post! thanks for sharing

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    1. Bill Trussell
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      Bill my wife has a keen eye for some very lovely photos. They were Hornberg streamers. Both ways of fishing them worked.

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  3. Nice fish and beautiful spot, were you using your hornbergs?

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    1. Klags
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      Adam, yes they were my flies. That soft hackle collar did a good job on convincing the brook trout they were real.

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  4. A lot of your posts bring back memories of Wisconsin. The woods, the streams, If I only knew something other than perch fishing I'd have been in Heaven.

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    1. Mark Kautz
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      Mark Wisconsin is a hot spot for brook trout. They are native there as well.

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  5. Great post, scenic photos capturing the beauty of the brookies and the surrounding area!!!

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    1. TROUTI
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      Pete I have to get you there one day.

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    2. Yes you do!! Sooner better than later!!!

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  6. Wow, Alan! What a beautiful setting and gorgeous "Salters". I can only imagine the adrenaline rush when one of those Brookies took your fly solidly.

    Really think your choice of Header picture today is wonderful.....................

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    1. Gramps Mel
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      Mel it's a natural high that can't be described. That's a pretty area.

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  7. Fox News Channel is interested in requesting permission to air some of your beautiful blog photos today (Friday 11/6/15). We will give you on-air credit. Just sent you a request via email to your aol.com account. Please let us know before 4pm ET today. We're on deadline for live TV show. Thank you!

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    1. Gina Peterson
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      Great news. Already responded.

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  8. Gina.....don't forget to mention that we lost a population of those fish on the Santuit River due to over development.

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    1. Let us know if you get a mention for Red Brook!!

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  9. Alan, those are some gorgeous photos. I love that stretch of stream in the top picture. Simply stunning. Both of those brook trout pictured are absolute gems. I especially like the vibrant colors and unique spots on the second one. I was going to ask about the hornbergs, but it seems like everyone else beat me to it...that's a killer fly! I see your photos are getting some deserved publicity. I agree with the above commenter...I hope Gina mentions the Santuit.

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    1. RI brook trout
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      Jonathan the Hornberg should be in your fly box. Those brookies were prime. I stopped to see the Santuit. Beautiful stream it's to bad others could not see the same.

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  10. Replies
    1. Along These Lines
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      Yes and I appreciate it.

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  11. I love this blog.

    You know, I was thinking. You seem to be incredibly in touch with a sense of describing what you see with the most defined color and emotion.

    If you ever considered describing a scene to a blind person, I think an audio version of this blog would be incredible to give color to blind .

    Connecting with true nature should be a National Adventure these days. With reduced gas prices and tons of opportunity out on the country-side, there's adventure to be found everywhere!

    I'm a disabled homeless veteran and I enjoy the freedom of being able to drive where necessary and make friends in great places while living on the road.

    Free-bird is alive again in the Veterans living in sobriety through love for nature and the great outdoors :D

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    1. Kory Noble,
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      First let me thank you for your service. These are only a few words but they come from my heart.
      This beautiful land has so much to offer, and the cost is not that high. Just spend the time to take care of it.

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    2. Leaning one day at a time - I can't wait to own my own land and spend my life taking care of it for my future generations - :) Sorry for the very delayed reply!

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  12. Just beautiful, Alan, including those hefty sea run brook trout. Following your blog is helping me to formulate how I will spend my retirement, with days like this on the streams and in the fields and woods. Thanks to you, I have started fly tying again, some of which don't turn out too bad!

    Best Regards, Sam

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    1. Parachute Adams
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      Sam I'm delighted that the few photos and some rambling thoughts have inspired. I hope you have the opportunity to enjoy retirement has I have. Tie my friend, most fish are not selective, and if they are there's always another stream where they're not.

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  13. Thanks to Tucker Carlson for mentioning your blog. We have some very beautiful brookie streams here in northeastern Pa, but sadly, no salters. Will be visiting your blog regularly!

    Best Regards,
    Ron

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    1. Unknown
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      Ron I do thank Tucker and the Fox News Channel as well as the many readers of this blog. Northeast PA is my hunting ground, beautiful area with many wild trout streams

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  14. That first photo looks so inviting!

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  15. Really lovely to see this - and I can't wait for Part !!.

    And I'd sure enjoy seeing the FOX segment if anyone has it!

    Please support sea-run brook trout and habitat that allows these special fish to grow and thrive.

    Join your local watershed council, help out a TU chapter, #keepem wet and check out our site (and or FB page) if you like for more pics and info.

    http://www.srbtc.org

    Thanks!

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  16. Very nice trip Alan, sorry I missed the Fox news segment!

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    1. Mark
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      Mark it was indeed. The stream is worth the trip and the brook trout a plus.

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  17. Beautiful fish and beautiful water but modern rod and reel seem out of place , imho. I would fish it with a South Bend 291, silk line and Meisselbach 270 skeleton reel. The overall scenario cries out for cane.

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    1. John Dornik
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      John many do fish with what you have described. Simplicity in modern times.

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  18. Great post as usual Alan. The landscape makes me think if I wasn't holding a fly rod I might forget why I was on those trails and just end up on a long hike. Very nice!

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    1. Drew LooknFishy
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      Drew we have done just that on several trip out. Much can be gained without a fly in the water.

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  19. The notion of sea-run fish is so fascinating, fish going to sea, then finding their way back to their natal streams. The logic and mysteries of Nature are so compelling.

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    1. Christopher Seep
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      Christopher these fish do not go far when they hit the salt. They will move about in the saltwater bays feeding. In warmer times they retreat back into the freshwater streams seeking the colder water. They are a special creature.

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  20. Anyone know if these types of streams hold trout down in NJ? I know the state stocks the deeper waters. But I don't have any idea if native trout remain in our hidden brooks which are numerous.

    Kevin
    Red Bank, NJ

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    1. Kevin,
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      Kevin I'm not certain of the sea-run brook trout in NJ. They do have many streams that have populations of wild brook trout.

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    1. TexWisGirl
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      Theresa I appreciate your comment.

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  22. Thanks ... I will have to develop a bit of local knowledge. My area is dominated by salt water fishing and a lot of private property.

    Kevin

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    1. Kevin Kinscherf
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      Kevin, go for it buddy. You never know what might be swimming.

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