Wednesday, December 9, 2015

Beyond Parr Markings....Not For Me.

There are those who find the call to big fish and those great rivers with storied pasts. Large brook trout seem to be an obsession that makes anglers cast all other fish to be placed second. I can't find fault with this for it's human nature. But I will share with you my thoughts.

I have taken my fair share of big brook trout, mostly in Maine but also a few locally. These fish while beautiful lacked that charm and beauty that is only found in small brook trout. If you take side by side photos, one of a large 16" or better brook trout and another one 6" you will surely see the latter is so much more beautiful. When you take into account where the 6" trout lives it makes it even more beautiful.


Close working in small intimate waters.


Wild brook trout, colored like no other fish that swims. Its parr markings in view. This is what I consider to be natures finest.




36 comments:

  1. So true. Of course, I will take a wild brooky of 16 or greater any time one wants my fly!

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    1. RM Lytle
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      Rowan I would too, but I'm more than satisfied with the 6" trophy.

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  2. I feel the same sentiment for the wild brookies. I am thankful there are still some streams around that support them. Hopefully they will be around for many years to come.

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    1. Parachute Adams
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      Sam they are hanging on, and with our protection they will be here for future generations to enjoy.

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  3. How could anyone not love a small stream with hidden quarters that let the beautiful brook trout reside there for all too love................. time stands still for an angler with this passion!

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    1. Gramps Mel
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      Mel you put it quite nicely.

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  4. I share your thoughts to the fullest. In absence of brookies my passion is focused to brown trout in very small streams. Their beauty is also best in small sizes.

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    1. Edeltrouts
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      I to enjoy the wild brown in our small streams. It seems the small ones concentrate their beauty.

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  5. Well said Brk Trt!! Natures wild jewels!! Priceless!!

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    1. TROUTI
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      Pete they are indeed priceless. Sorry I couldn't make it out today.

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  6. I agree with you all the way and would add that sometimes the small stream brookie can be just as hard to catch as the "big one".

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    1. Chris "Kiwi" Kuhlow
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      Chris you as an angler who has pursued the wild brookie on the small stream knows this all to well. Smart little guys.

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  7. Alan - Agreed, plus small stream brook trout will eagerly take a dry at almost anytime of the year. Although I am sure there are plenty of exceptions, it appears that those who target "large" brook trout are doing so in deeper water as in ponds and lakes

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  8. Mark
    Thanks
    You and I have taken brookies on the dry fly every month of the year, exception for me was last year. There was just to much ice.

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  9. Replies
    1. Richard Strolis
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      Appreciated Rich

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  10. The lure for me is largely in the beauty of the small ones and the challenge of catching them! I agree completely!

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    1. Adam
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      Adam that plays a very big part.

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  11. I totally agree the brook trouts beauty usually matches the surroundings something I will never get enough of

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    1. Brad Basehore
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      Brad you are right in with most of us.

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  12. Alan
    I certainly agree with you when it comes to color and habitat for those brook stream trout. Their colors are hard to match. I am one that has never been obsessed with landing huge fish, weather its warm water or cold water species. Give me a 9 to 10 inch stocker on my 3 weight and I can have lots of fun. Thanks for sharing

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    1. Bill Trussell
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      Bill I never tire of them. They all look the same but they are not.

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  13. Alan, I do occasionally fish a couple of larger rivers, but my heart will always belong to those little gems found in smaller waters. Your brookies are spectacular.

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    1. Howard Levett
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      Howard there is a lot of charm in fishing small streams, and an occaisional surprise.

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  14. The charm of those small waters would make any experience great. Being able to place a fly in the water a huge success. Landing a wild brook trout of any size is a real treasure.

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    1. Drew LooknFishy
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      Drew the pleasures seem to build on each other. This happens every outing.

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  15. This is making consider a brookie trip soon.

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    1. Kevin Frank
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      Go for it buddy. The weather has been wonderful.

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  16. While I have never caught a brook trout, I completely agree with you and your stance. I would much rather fish a river that holds wild musky hours away, than fish a stocked lake minutes from my house. The wild fish have a certain something about them that the stockers just don't possess.

    I also prefer the small creeks and rivers near me over the big lakes. I just love wading and wandering through the forest. One day I hope to make it up that way to explore all of those "thin blue lines" (one of your phrases).

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    1. Justin Carfagnini
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      Justin you are in good company here. Many hold the same feelings.

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  17. Alan your words could not be more true. I make an annual trip for big browns and steelhead. They are beautiful fish however.... Brookies hold a place in my heart as they are what I fished for growing up. Their colors,what a 6 inch fish has to go thru to survive and the environment in which they live make it something that must be cherished.

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    1. Brookie61
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      Kurt, we all love that rip of a big fish. But that splashy rise of a wild brookie is hard to beat. The small stream is the place for me as well.

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    2. I grew up in Coventry and my MOM would pack me a lunch. I would be gone for the day.To watch one of those little jewels take a fly is something that future generations need to experience.

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    3. Brookie61
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      Kurt I can recall days like you described, they go fast. The future is ours to protect and make sure those who wish to seek some of fly fishing's greatest pleasures are there for them.

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  18. I live on a golf course along the east slope of the Blue Ridge. After studying the very small stream which runs through our course for two years, I rigged my 3wt and explored the tumble down creek for 45 minutes in mid-Nov. Several herons were working the water, which gave me some encouragement. First pool yielded one ferocious aborted attack by a large flash, which I took to be a rainbow. The big guy disappeared, but successive casts with size 18 dry flies yielded five spectacular native rookies, the larges of which was seven inches. My disappointment over the large flash missed attack evaporated as I took in the marvelous late fall colors of Virginia's only truly native fish. Made my day!

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    1. Doug Connell
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      Doug that is a wonderful story #18 dry flies and wild brook trout, a fine memory for sure.
      I fished SNP last October and loved it.

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