Thursday, December 3, 2015

Rangeley, Eastern, New England...what's in a name?

New England, the birthplace of the streamer fly. That statement can be debated. What I know of it is that a Connecticut native, Charles "Shang" Wheeler and a Maine native Carrie Stevens were probably the two in the fore front of streamer fly creation. Another side note here is the name of the featherwing streamer fly..Rangeley style, eastern style, New England style and a few more names perhaps. Noted writer and streamer fly historian Graydon Hilyard states in is book  "Carrie Stevens Maker of Rangeley Favorite Trout and Salmon Flies" Carrie referred to the style as "eastern". My self I'll make this claim now "I'm no expert on this name" but I have always referred to the streamer type as "Rangeley". There are more knowledgeable people out there who can shed more info on this subject.

Well back to the reason for this post. I fish a stream in Massachusetts called Avery Brook, a beautiful stream with wild brook trout. To commemorate the beauty of this stream I created this streamer fly. I guess it can be called a "New England-Rangeley style feather wing streamer.



"Avery Brook"


A sleek and sparsely tied group of feathers.


At the bottom of this post is a link to the wonderful world of "Streamers"....the streamer list is a fantastic resource. Check it out.







18 comments:

  1. Beautiful streamer Alan,you do not often see that particular feather used for a shoulder.

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    1. phly
      Thanks
      The pheasant has some beautiful feathers. The colors do blend so well.

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    1. Jim Yaussy Albright
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      Jim some of the streamers that were created in that era were an inspiration to me.

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  3. Awesome streamer. I'm with you, some how, calling the style "Rangely" just seems appropriate... Though I guess if Steven's herself used "Eastern" perhaps I should adjust. Regardless, your fly is gorgeous!

    Will

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    1. Hibernation
      Thanks
      Will after seeing and reading about the streamers that originated in that area of Maine I to will continue to call them Rangeley streamers.

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  4. Just an awesome streamer Al!!!

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    1. TROUTI
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      Pete I appreciate that comment.

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  5. Beauty of a streamer, Alan. Is that destined for use on the Farmington? A big brown would go for that, I am sure.

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    1. Parachute Adams
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      Sam actually this streamer will be given away for Christmas to a follower of this blog. Details soon.

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  6. I know nothing of these type of streamers except how beautiful they look. The Colors on this one are stunning.

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    1. Howard Levett
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      Howard they are similar to the Atlantic salmon flies.

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  7. "My self I'll make this claim now "I'm no expert on this name" "......I am the proud owner of some of your streamers and can easily say you are an expert on all aspects of streamers. The latest creation is another example why. Nicely done!

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    1. Chris "Kiwi" Kuhlow
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      Chris, thank you.

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  8. Alan
    Streamers are by far the most colorful of all fly patterns used in fly fishing. The Avery Brook is one of those colorful patterns. Awesome job at the bench. Thanks for sharing

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    1. Bill Trussell
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      Bill most streamers possess that color flair, but some can be quite drab. I like color.

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  9. There is a great chapter entitled, "Real Dogs and Dreadful Scourges; Have you invented the streamer yet?" in Paul Schullery's book, "Fly-Fishing Secrets of the Ancients; A Celebration of Five Centuries of Lore and Wisdom". He does a great job writing about who takes/gets credit for streamer invention, etc. Very enjoyable read; Paul has a great sense of humor. And enjoyed this post, Alan.

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    1. Gary
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      I have not read that, but will check into it. Lots of mystery surrounding those early long flies.

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