Saturday, September 3, 2016

Catch And Release...A Brook Trout Story

I woke up at five with the intention of being stream side at 6. Breakfast was a fried egg and a half of an English muffin and two cups of coffee. The Honda was rolling east and soon I was at my destination. But rather than fish the familiar section of stream I chose to explore a bit. Please join me and lets see what happens.

I know there is a stream out there. The only issue was the heavy head high flora in the way. My walk through the field was tough, but the smells and the color made it OK.


When I got to the tree line I saw the stream...a beautiful sight.


I stopped here for a spell, just taking in the sights and sounds of this pristine wild place. While I enjoy the solitude I am really never alone.


A companion, while they can't tell you what fly to use they still add to the pleasure.


Looking upstream I noticed a rise. The brook trout grabbed something on the bank....perhaps a grasshopper, or damsel fly.


I gazed downstream looking at a place to enter the narrow stream. A problem is that the bottom is so soft in places that it's better to challenge the briars, well maybe not.


The fly, "The Cinberg"...this fly has a following among brook trout fly fishers. The fly first fished in the Catskills in now a favorite of mine. This fly was tied by a fellow from New Jersey, his name is Chuck, also known as "Barleywine" on various forums.


I gazed at the trout rise, he came up several times in the span of a minute.


I could see the brook trout. He was a sitting along the bottom, and I knew he saw me. The issue was the cast. Once the cast was made either the fly, line or my movement would have spooked the fish. I moved a bit further upstream and just flicked the fly out into the current. The plan was to let it drift downstream by itself with no casting involved. The Cinberg moved close to him, he moved quickly to the fly and then he struck. I pulled back and the fish was hooked.


He battled as if he were a giant. Gills flaring and his flanks became inflamed. I soon got control and the wild jewel was at hand. As I lifted him up to take a photo I noticed the fly came out. I had only seconds to get a photo and that was of his release.


Goodbye friend...we will meet again I'm certain.





42 comments:

  1. That is a great story!! Spectacular photos of the scenery. The colors on that brookie are just awesome!! Great Read Brk Trt!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. TROUTI
      Thanks
      Pete the title was only a small part of the outing.
      Love those little waters.

      Delete
  2. Muy bueno tu día de pesca Alan, como siempre admiro esas truchas, un gran abrazo from tierra del Fuego, Argentina

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Armando Milosevic
      Thanks
      Armando I'm not fluent in the language but I got the message and it's appreciated.

      Delete
  3. All I can say is beautiful, both the trout and the story. I have never seen such red fins on a brook trout. And that one rise right by the bank, it almost appears he took the bug on dry land! Amazing, Alan. Beautiful picture of the gold finch too. Thanks for what you post on this blog site. Regards, Sam

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Parachute Adams
      Thanks
      Sam that brookie seemed to be on fire. I never actually saw what the trout grabbed but I think what ever it was it was on land. Thank you.

      Delete
    2. Judging by the rise rings on the water it had to be something on the bank there. Maybe even a frog, who knows?! Gotta love our native brook trout. They sure know how to survive and thrive when given good water to do it in.

      Delete
    3. Sam, he did go for something on the bank, frog, salamander, maybe a small snake. Brookies are a true survivor. Their tenacity for life can't be compared.

      Delete
    4. That is for sure! I get the feeling that brook trout has been living there for a good while and knows how to get his meals. Awesome photo.

      Delete
  4. After that stare down, I'm sure the anticipation of the strike was intense. Loved the mid-fight photos.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Michael Agneta
      Thanks
      Mike "the stare down" I like that.

      Delete
  5. Definitely one of your best post Alan. The narrative fit those beautiful photos.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Howard Levett
      Thanks
      Howard when you such wonderful subjects it's easy to put it all together....as long as I can spell the words.

      Delete
  6. I have followed your blog for some time now and I agree with the others, one of your best posts. The narrative you told had me glued to your short story. I think the time you took to observe, photograph and document put me stream side with you. Great tale and thanks for sharing.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Jesse S
      Thanks
      Jesse I try for the most part to do just that. Putting you there with me is why I do this.
      Oh and I like it.

      Delete
  7. Replies
    1. Dave J
      Thanks
      Dave I'm glad you enjoyed it.

      Delete
  8. Brilliant ! Im so envious of all those little streams you get to fish, nothing like that in the UK near by me.
    regards
    George

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. George
      Thanks
      George those streams can be so rewarding and so frustrating...but I'll go back again.

      Delete
  9. Alan,your post was great,like so many that you have done. I enjoy them because it takes me along with you. The story with the photos really puts it all together. I really like the photo of the trout taking a fly off the bank,great timing. I would love the recipe for that fly it has all the characteristics of a great small stream fly. Thanks for the trip.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Brad Basehore
      Thanks
      Brad I know that morning I saw lots of damsel flies on the waters edge, I think that's what he took.
      I will give you the link http://www.sparsegreymatter.com/viewtopic.php?f=2&t=2878

      There are variations out there to.

      Delete
  10. Top of list blog post. One of my favorites ever. Well done. Love.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Adam
      Thanks
      Adam it's very much appreciated.

      Delete
  11. Alan, I admire your willingness to fish such a challenging stream. I still can't believe that you were able to get that photo of the rise against the bank...they happen in a fleeting moment, but you captured it, along with a gorgeous troutl Your post reflects patience and a true passion for what you do. So well done. Thank you.

    -Chuck

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Chuck Coronato
      Thanks
      Chuck I had the camera ready because there were several fish rising. I thought I might be able to get a shot at an airborne brookie. Passion indeed, sometimes the patience wears thin.

      Delete
  12. Some of the best pleasures I have enjoyed in my two years of fishing has been reading/seeing your posts. A pleasing story teller with a wonderful knack with a lens. Thanks for chosing to continue to post your travels.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Bill/Tully
      Thanks
      Bill that's good to hear, and it's appreciated.
      I wish I were better with the words, as well as the typing. I hope you'll continue to read SSR's.

      Delete
  13. Replies
    1. TexWisGirl
      Thanks
      Theresa he was one of the sparkling jewels of the day.

      Delete
  14. From the first picture, I would not have guessed there was a stream out there. Would have been a shame to miss that Brookie.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Mark Kautz-Shoreman
      Thanks
      Mark the funny thing is it's a slow moving creek so you can't hear the water. It was a good bet it was there though. It seemed he wanted to have his picture taken.

      Delete
  15. I have caught many a fish using that same technique in that same exact spot. I must make my way out there this week.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. RM Lytle
      Thanks
      Rowan the stream does have some beautiful fish, only the access is horrible. I think if the rains ever materialize it might make for easier fishing.

      Delete
    2. Actually when the water comes up all the fish push back into the bushes. It seems almost as though they just disappear!

      Delete
  16. Broookies are always pretty but this time of year the colours on them really pop. Enjoyed the story.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. ben
      Thanks
      It seems they will not be outdone by the fall foliage.
      I know it's early but the males might be showing off a bit.

      Delete
  17. Such an inspiration. Your website captures the true essence of fly fishing as well as or better than any. I share this with my wife - always seeking new recipe ideas - to attempt to communicate what draws me to the flowing waters and the simplicity found only in the near perfection of it all. Profound thanks.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Rick in NY
      Thanks
      Rick you have put it so very well, and I appreciate it.

      Delete
  18. Another beautiful shot. That pic is a keeper for sure! Thanks for bringing us along.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Ralph Long
      Thanks
      Ralph it almost seemed as if he posed for it.
      I hope to get another look at him.

      Delete
  19. Well... Alan, I don't know. Step away from my blog reading duties for a day or so and look at what I almost missed. That is one of the most beautiful fish I have ever seen! Sure appreciate the work you went to bring it to all of us here in blogger land.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Grandpa Mel
      Thanks
      Mel that brookie was stunning. I to am guilty of missing some blog activity. Catching up is always enjoyable though.

      Delete