Thursday, October 20, 2016

The Daddy "Log" Pool Adventure

Fly fishing is a contemplative endeavor, and small stream wild brook trout fishing takes that to another level. When one walks to the stream and takes in views as this they can be put into a sort of trance. This trance will be there until the first trout is taken. A mid-autumn day, and it found me walking and searching for  brookies. They seem to found in the most difficult of places and can take a mad dash for cover at the least little sound they hear. I have tried various ways to sneak up on a pool and sometimes I'm lucky in not spooking the fish.



This pool at the stream bend has always intrigued me. There has to be fish holding there. The problem is putting the fly in there without telling the fish your there. Well after many attempts over the months of fishing it I finally got a good result.


First cast, as the fly began to sink this brookie hit.


This pool takes on the look of black oil flowing instead of water. The water is so very clear it's just the stream bottom is so dark.




I love places as this. I could sit here and listen to the stream talk.


Just downstream from that beautiful riffle I found this wild jewel.


This spot I've mentioned before in a previous post, I call it Daddy "Log" Pool because of the large log that has fallen and lies across the pool. There are some beautiful trout that hold in there but presenting the fly has been a challenge. This outing I was going to try to fish the pool from above the log. As I waded to the right side of the log, lifting my leg in an attempt to get over the log. My planted foot slipped and I found myself sitting in silt and leaf debris. Not panicked I got myself out of the mess and sat on the log trying to get back in order. That's when I looked to the far side of the pool and saw this. I was a perfect position for fishing the pool. I was low, and had a clear cast to cover the pool.


Several quiet casts into the pool and the line stopped. I pulled tight and the fish ran. I could tell it was a big fish by the bend in the rod. The fish ran upstream under the log, and I tried my best to stop him without him getting off. That mission was accomplished and I found this wild brook trout at my hand. He was so black he would have looked like a log sitting under water.


Just a word about this fine rod....Cane and Silk 5' 2/3 wt. glass rod. This rod gets it done. I just put a new line on it, Cortland 444 DT 3wt, and for me it's the best line to use with the rod.















29 comments:

  1. Great story and a beautiful fish. I love those aha moments when you figure things out.

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    1. Jay Guarneri
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      Jay That's just what it was. Should have figured it out sooner though.

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  2. Replies
    1. Chris "kiwi" Kuhlow
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      Chris he was as dark as the water. A fine specimen.

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  3. Alan - What a magnificent brook trout in fall colors. I saw some huge brook trout in there back in the spring. Looks like you found one!

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    1. Mark Wittman
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      Mark he was one of the best fish of the fall.
      Mark it's not the stream your thinking of.

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  4. Brk Trt, holy moly! What a beautiful brookies, especially the last one. The size of that last brookie is staggering. When I look at it, I was thinking it probably has spent many years living in that local area and how fruitful of a stream providing a good food source. Good stuff!!

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    1. DRYFLYGUY
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      Phil no doubt he has been around for a few years. The stream is a healthy one in all aspects.

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  5. It pains me that I haven't been able to get up to that stream in a while. I'm glad I can enjoy it through your photos though!

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    1. RM Lytle
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      Rowan the stream has it's rewards, but as you know you have to really earn them.

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  6. Always a nice trip. That big one is awesome.

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    1. Mark Kautz-Shoreman
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      Mark he was a beauty.

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  7. Replies
    1. TexWisGirl
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      Theresa I appreciate it.

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  8. Beautiful pictures and report, Alan. All brookies are spectacular, but that last big one might be the most colorful one I have ever seen. That is one big native!

    Regards, Sam

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    1. Parachute Adams
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      Sam I'm in the camp that believes as you do, they're all beautiful, but there are those few that will always hold an edge.

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  9. Alan,
    All I can say is...Whoa! Awesomely beautiful post with fall at its apparent peak! The brook trout that you show are incredible! It still amazes me how these creatures not only survive but thrive in such small streams! I so love to see this! Thank you for allowing me to see thru your eyes (aka the cameras lens) the true essence of your surroundings! Each season holds its own beauty but Autumn is very special indeed!
    From Southeast Ohio (which is quite awesome right now),
    Dougsden

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    1. Dougsden
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      Doug these brook trout are amazing. Their tenacity for life is beyond words. Every time out I find out something new about them. Autumn is indeed a prime time to showcase their exceptional beauty.
      Enjoy the Ohio foliage friend.

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    2. I am from Ohio, Dougsden, and have interest in the state still. I read that there is a unique strain of brook trout in the headwaters of the Chagrin River watershed. Authorities thought they were extirpated many years ago, but they are still surviving there it was recently discovered. I thought that might be of interest to you. Regards, Sam

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    3. Sorry, should have said from Ohio originally, but live in New England now. I was surprised to hear Ohio had a native brook trout population.

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  10. Your quest for brook trout takes you to some wonderful places.
    I have to agree that the last brook trout is a beauty but aren't all brook trout incredibly beautiful?
    Cheers,
    Steve.

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    1. Steve Hynes
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      Steve that's one of the reasons I seek brook trout...the places they call home.
      Stay well "downunder"

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  11. I don't believe I've ever seen such a magnificent brookie. Well done my friend.

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    1. Howard Levett
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      Howard he was in full "show off" dress.

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  12. Sam,
    Thanks for the info. about Ohio's small but mighty strain of brook trout. It was not too long ago that someone (perhaps you? I can't remember) turned me on to an article about the remaining brookies in the headwater of the Chagrin. It seems that they were working on improving the habitat in that section of the stream which would, I think, be of the first order! It seems as if our little speckled beauties are right in the middle of some wicked developement going on in that area and they were having a tough time just hanging on! Let's hope the habitat improvements help and that the remaining brookies will take off!
    E-mail me soon and thanks for the info!
    Doug

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