Thursday, December 1, 2016

Hemlocks And Riffles

The hemlock and the riffle are probably my to favorite places to fish when I'm on a small stream. I will never pass up the chance to toss a fly in either location if possible. Over many years and  many different streams I've fished it's these places that seem to produce for me. On this outing which was to find the stream on the low side I was able to find a few deep pools that held some nice trout. As most times they were able to see me and scattered like frightened mice. So the alternative to getting frustrated I chose to fish the riffles and hemlocks to help conceal my presence.



This section of water was flowing well, and was quite deep. Along with that there were leaf jams and other wood debris that seem to say "fishy". I dropped the fly on the first slick spot and "boom" a brook trout rose and took the caddis.


This pretty little guy was photographed and thanked....he was back at it in a few seconds.

I continued to fish this mine-section and was able to bring another brookie to the surface. Further results here were a fly in the debris and a loos of that fly.

This fast little run had an interesting undercut right at the tree. Alan you know there has to be a fish there. One cast, two casts, three casts and a forth cast that brought the fish up.


A striking lady...she was in perfect condition with the most beautiful colored spots. The red dots almost look like a fine point marker placed them there.

It was a good day fishing under the hemlocks and in the riffles....by the way the elk-hair caddis is a perfect fly for such places.







20 comments:

  1. Alan
    The cut banks and hemlocks are a blessing on sunny days for the those colorful brookies. Thanks for sharing

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Bill Trussell
      Thanks
      Bill those are gold mines at most times. Riffles can cover up a lot of angler sins.

      Delete
  2. Thanks for sharing your strategy. Always rewarding when the thought out plan produces success. Brookies!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Grandpa Mel
      Thanks
      Mel many outings of trial and error eventually pay off. I just have to remember it.

      Delete
  3. Replies
    1. George
      Thanks
      I love it when it works out.

      Delete
  4. Beautiful creek and beautiful fish.... looks like a great trip indeed.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Doug Korn,Fly Tyer
      Thanks
      Doug it a sweet little stream, and the fish that inhabit it are truly special.

      Delete
  5. Alan, You never cease to amaze me with your imagery. Very very nice!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Ralph Long
      Thanks
      Ralph it always helps when your subjects are inspiring. Most of the natural world is just that.

      Delete
  6. Pretty stream and brookies. I bet it is not running low today.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. TROUT1
      Thanks
      Pete that's a bet I'd loose. I hope we continue to fill the glass.

      Delete
  7. Alan, you never cease to amaze me with you very well documented trips. Beautiful.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Howard Levett
      Thanks
      Howard few words. but then the photos tell it so much better.

      Delete
  8. Just beautiful, both the stream and the trout. Your blog site is always a pleasure for me to see whether at home or on a work trip. I always check in to see it.

    Regards, Sam

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Parachute Adams
      Thanks
      Sam I'm glad you find the time to stop by. I enjoy so much hearing from my readers.

      Delete
  9. Alan,
    This has to be one of my all time favorites! I now fully understand the relationship between the hemlocks and the water below them (riffles). In this entry we find a wonderfully tied elk hair caddis, absolutely gorgeous surroundings, brook trout that defy description, and a narrative that is simple, yet very elegant! What more could we ask for!
    I have to agree with Sam above in that I find myself checking in daily just to take in the beauty of this area you call home! This blog is my morning coffee sometimes enjoyed in the evening but always enjoyed none the less!
    Dougsden

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Dougsden
      Thanks
      Doug, in some areas of the natural range of the brook trout they are referred to as "Hemlock Trout"...could be something to that.

      Delete
  10. Alan, as usual your images place us in areas we would love to be,instead of dealing with the daily grind of work.the markings on those fish are truly remarkable. Hemlocks and undercut banks,truely trout magnets. Thankyou for the trip. How was the deer hunting in pa.?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Brad Basehore
      Thanks
      Brad glad to see you posting. The hemlock and undercut bank are truly trout magnets. A close third is peacock herl.
      PA deer hunting was great, but the harvesting not so good. I may have another shot at it next week.

      Delete