Saturday, January 21, 2017

What A January Day

Good morning folks. A few days ago I had one of my best days on the stream this year. Kirk and Rowan and myself joined up to fish a little stream. The day started out cloudy but mild. The water flows were perfect and the clarity of the stream was unbelievable. I must say upfront that I did not move much from where I entered the stream, maybe a 100 yards and that maybe stretching it some. My reasoning for this was...the very first cast that Rowan made as we reached the streams edge was a rise to a caddis dry and subsequent hook-up. After seeing that how could I change locations.

Kirk and Rowan moved upstream and downstream, both had very good success. The brookies were very hungry this day.




Gin clear, very nice temperatures, and the sun made an entry which felt so good.



My first of the day took a purple and starling spider. The fish was so beautiful and still holding brilliant colors.


These fish were strong, healthy and so pretty.


Lots of "nooks and crannies" here, and lots of brook trout too.


Most of the fish today were taken on just two spider patterns. The purple and starling and this one.
A size 18, brown thread body, a sparse hares thorax, and two turns of starling.


My last brookie of the day, and the prettiest. That Cane And Silk glass rod is so perfect for this type of fishing....right Mr. Fontinallis?









29 comments:

  1. Simply Gorgeous brook trout, scenery, and the poppy seed horn! Nice Job!!

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    1. TROUT1
      Thanks
      Pete that horn was so good, but the fishing was better.

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    2. Yes I see that by your post!! Was the horn a pre or post trip snack? They are good!

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    3. Pete, that's what I had for breakfast this morning.

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  2. Ok, you have me hooked (sorry for the pun) on soft hackles. I have recently been tying up some with hen saddle and some with starling hackles. I went to a local small stream here in Ga that holds wild rainbows and brookies. I am pretty decent at fishing dries in these spots but I am still lacking in knowledge on how to fish soft hackles in small (tiny) streams. I usually fish a 6' hand tied leader of Joe Humphreys design that turns dries over very well.
    Do you cast your soft hackles straight upstream, quartering, or down-and-across?
    How do you manage your drifts and the leader (high-sticking to hold the leader off the water, leader floating on the water as 'indicator' to see takes)?
    How do you detect strikes?
    I love the simple beauty of soft hackles and small streams with wild fish, I just don't yet know how to connect the two! Please help.
    Thanks,
    Jed

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    1. dawgvet1
      Thanks
      Jed, in slower moving water, pools I'll cast upstream and allow the fly to roll with the current. A soft-hackle fished like that will give great motion to those moving hackles. My preferred method is quartering downstream I like this in faster moving water. I'll cast to the bank, control the line so that it's almost tight, allow the fly to finish it's drift, when that is done I'll let the fly hang or sink what ever the stream allows it to do. Letting it set there for a moment or two I'll then just twitch it, and then retrieve it. 95% of the time I'll take a strike at the moment I twitch it. Kirk made a comment on how the fish see such a small fly, and at that moment a brookie hit it.
      I hope this helps you, but don't give up.

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  3. stunning again Alan, your making me want to come to USA....lol

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    1. George
      Thanks
      I could put you in some fine waters.

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  4. Can't wait to get out and try the flies. Season opens last Saturday in April, but with all the snow up there, probably end of May or June before you can touch water.

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    Replies
    1. Mark Kautz
      Thanks
      Mark that's a long time. But the water resulting from the snow pack is well worth the wait.
      The flies should do you well.

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  5. Another great post Alan. Thanks once again!

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    Replies
    1. Howard Levett
      Thanks
      Howard it's my supporting cast that makes these posts great.

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  6. Beautiful! As far as not moving much, as they say why leave fish to find fish. Those brookies are still in their fall spawn colors it seems.

    I got out today on the Swift and connected on two dandies. Tomorrow will be spent on the brook I spent time when I was a younger man.

    Regards, Sam

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    Replies
    1. Parachute Adams
      Thanks
      Sam it was like I was fishing in October. I'm glad you were out today, beautiful weather for January, and two trout is a good day. I hope you do well tomorrow.

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  7. Looks like a blast was had by all!

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    1. Hibernation
      Thanks
      Will that it was. Always nice when the fish cooperate.

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  8. Alan, it is remarkable how "each" fish has it's own identity and beauty to behold. We, your readers, are blessed to share this experience with you.

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    1. Grandpa Mel
      Thanks
      Mel they're all brook trout but they are so different.

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  9. Poppy seed horn. Makes me smile. For years when I held a secret clearance, we were warned never to eat anything containing poppy seeds (evokes a positive drug test response). That's ok, I prefer salted horns anyway.

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    1. John Dornik
      Thanks
      I recall a Sienfeld show dealing with poppyseed muffins. I have to see if salted horns are available here.

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  10. Alan, I'm glad you showed me a brown spider,I finally purchased some brown silk. I think it's the last color I want in my box.im going to experiment with some small ones with grey hen hackle for the blue winged olive. Beautiful fish and water to match. Enjoy the nice weather,its probably temporary. Thankyou.

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    Replies
    1. Brad Basehore
      Thanks
      Brad that brown spider really worked that day, today they would not touch it. Winter fishing, I wish I could figure it out. We have a nor'easter on tap for Tuesday.

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  11. Alan
    Just wondering if you are using a fluorocarbon tippet to land these beauties? Glad you guys had a successful day! Thanks for sharing

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    Replies
    1. Bill Trussell
      Thanks
      Bill I only use 6x fluro tippet. I find it to be the best.

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  12. Alan, in using your 4'10" rod, what would you consider a "normal" casting distance? I understand the stream/foliage dictates much of the choice. I guess I was curious to how far you are from where your flies drop. Thank you.

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    1. Bill/Tully
      Thanks
      Bill most times it's about 5 to 10 feet. But the rod will put out 20 yards with out a problem. As you said the stream dictates the cast.

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  13. Nice to see you guys out enjoying some warm January weather!

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    Replies
    1. Mark Wittman
      Thanks
      Mark it's great to be able to fish without the bulky coats. But I guess at some point that will change.

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