Wednesday, May 31, 2017

Salters of Red Brook

Yesterday I paid a visit to a favorite stream of mine, Red Brook. Now this would be my second visit in a week, and one of so many over the years. Each time there I gain more knowledge of this incredible fishery. Having fished for brook trout for 40 plus years I figured I had things down pretty good, but these sea-run variety have me back in school.

When I arrived at the Lyman Reserve the weather was cloudy and a mist was a feature but the sun did make a welcomed appearence. I geared up and hit the trail. My plan was to walk upstream using the trail as far as it went, then bush whack a bit further and then fish downstream to tidewater.


The stream side vegetation is now complete and some areas it's very difficult to fish but the trout are there and were willing to take a fly.


Most of the brook trout up this far are in their stream dress, in other words they look like regular brookies. Remember these fish spend time in the sea and will loose their color but gain it back once in fresh water. In the bay they have lots of fish to eat and that's one of the reasons streamers are so effective.Now the curve ball...this beautiful Red Brook specimen took a spider pattern, a small fly if ever there was one. In the stream eat what's there I guess.


Here's where it got interesting. This is as close to the sea as one can get. Last week I hooked a large silver fish just upstream from here. He bolted upstream and then ran downstream very fast. I turned him but he was to strong and headed for the bottom eventually shaking the hook.


Red Brook "salter"
This day I hoked another fish and he started his fight much in the same way as the one I lost last week. This time I was able to win the battle. These are sea-run brook trout. This one still has a muted color from the salt. look at the size of his head and mouth...streamers are hit viciously here. The strength of these fish is hard to about in words but I will say this "they're not your average brook trout"....


I don't know if I'll be back this way for a spell. Summer is for tourists...October is for brook trout.









16 comments:

  1. lovely Alan and as we always say, everyday is a school day we are always learning something new. Well done mate

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. George
      Thanks
      George I love learning especially when I'm in fishing school. They teach us a lot.

      Delete
  2. Very nice Alan. Some size to those fish.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Ralph Long
      Thanks
      Ralph they put on weight in the months they are in salt water.

      Delete
  3. Just beautiful. It makes me happy that there are still brook trout around that run to the ocean from that stream. I hope it always stays that way. Best, Sam

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Parachute Adams
      Thanks
      Sam there is a determined strain of trout in that stream, I have confidence they will continue to be healthy.

      Delete
  4. Hi Alan, Always happy to hear about "salters" first hand. If the Striper population, in MA is anything close to what it is now, in CT, I'm amazed any salters, at all, survive their sojourn into the salt.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. John Dornik
      Thanks
      John there are ample bass, and these fish deal with them. In the photo of the bridge there have been reports of 40" stripers in that pool. The salters are at the point of moving upstream. The water in the bay is warming and they will find comfort in the stream.

      Delete
  5. Alan
    Some very solid looking brookies you have there! Pretty colorful also.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. TROUT1
      Thanks
      Pete they do eat well in that stream.

      Delete
  6. Alan
    Gorgeous brook, had to be a blast on the fly---I could see where this place would become crowded the closer it gets to summer. Thanks for sharing

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Bil Trussell
      Thanks
      Bill on a 3wt fly...The Cape is big time tourist turf.

      Delete
  7. Another marvelous Red Brook post..those brookies come in strong and aggressive after surviving all the predators in the salt..once they get to the fresh they're pretty much top dog..

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. penbayman
      Thanks
      Mike top dog they are. You have some fine salter streams in your neck of the woods. One day I'll pay a visit.

      Delete
  8. Replies
    1. Mark Kautz
      Thanks
      It sure is awesome buddy.

      Delete