Wednesday, December 6, 2017

December Day's

A December morning, the skies were so gray almost matching the color of the trees which stand to face what will soon become the harsh season know as winter. The morning was cold with a breeze that found it's way through several layers of clothing to my skin. I can usually warm some by walking along the stream but that day it did not work. I did my best to push the cold thoughts to the back of my mind, and try to put forth the thought of a wild trout coming from the beautiful stream I was fishing. This and a break or two of sun all be it short seemed to ease the cold. This is December angling.



The stream was pushing along, it's flow somewhat diminished from a lack of rain held some hope of a trout setting in a hole as the tail of a riffle. If not for the hemlock and pine all the colors would blend together as one.


Winter berries along the stream gave a eye pleasing look. Little things that so important to a December day.


Suddenly a trout takes your offering, it's will to get free put's a bend in the rod. Soon it is at hand and it is suddenly your cold hands and body are warm. As the fish swims back to a hiding place you feel truly what it's like to fish a December day.







23 comments:

  1. Alan, props to you for making the best out of a bleak time of year. I am glad that pretty brown came to hand.

    Sam

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    1. Parachute Adams
      Thanks
      Sam the bleakness seems erased when a nice fish comes to hand. We may get some snow this weekend.

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  2. Alan
    I stop fishing in the winter some years ago, but after reading this post I just might have to give the Sipsey Tailrace a try in January when we move back to Jasper. Beautiful brook, thanks for sharing

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    Replies
    1. Bill Trussell
      Thanks
      Bill winter angling can have its rewards. I look forward to your Sipsey return.

      Delete
  3. Alan
    Nice job!! Hopefully the rain last night helped fill the coffers. That "Pinkie" always works.

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    1. TROUT1
      Thanks
      Pete it was an ample rainfall in some areas, always a help. Love pinkie.

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  4. Hi Alan,

    I'm currently living in the Midwest but do enjoy your blog. I was wondering, are all of the brookies about that size, or do they get larger?

    Thanks

    John

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    Replies
    1. John V.
      Thanks
      John welcome.
      The wild trout be it brook or brown grow to a size the habitat will allow. Most of these streams are small, some you could jump across. Most of the fish are limited to about 6-8 inches, with a few going 10-12. All of them are hard fighters and do offer a challenge to those who seek them. Wild, nothing like it.

      Delete
  5. always nice to see the winter berries, brings a bit of colour to the riverside, nice post again alan.

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    1. George
      Thanks
      That little bit of bright red does liven the winter landscape.

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  6. As always Alan....love your pics!

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    1. Ralph Long
      Thanks
      The pics are easy when your subjects are beautiful.

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  7. Great post Alan. I'll leave the winter fishing to you and River Damsel.

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    Replies
    1. Howard Levett
      Thanks
      Howard winter fishing can be good at times even enjoyable when weather plays in the same ball-park.

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  8. Great post once again Alan, the stream looks so clean and fresh. My local stream is closed for the winter so I have to look further afield for my winter fishing fix.
    Alistair

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    Replies
    1. Anonymous
      Thanks
      Alistair, get your fix here.
      I believe Grayling is in season for you at this time?

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    2. Yes it is Alan. Through the winter is prime grayling fishing and I have already had 3 productive trips out so far this season with fast and furious action to spiders (winter brown & waterhen bloa have been the top soft hackles) and dry flies (small klinkhammers and midge emergers the best dries), I don't like having to use heavy nymphs!!!!
      Alistair

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    3. Alistair, I love hearing of your success with "spiders"...both of the flies mentioned are productive here along with the "smoke fly" and peacock and partridge.
      I don't fish very many nymphs either.

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  9. Alan, you captured my feelings for winter very well. I absolutely adore being outside during the winter season. The hush of the environment as life slows down for the harsh season, the bite of the cold, and how that wears away as your body starts to move and warm very much appeal to me. My fishing does slow down, but it is replaced with walks in the woods with the dog, and potentially the flyrod.

    Just a wonderful time of the year. As all seasons are. The best part of living in the North East with 4 very distinct seasons is each one is special, and I look forward to each and every one. As my mind and heart start to wander into the next season, it is probably close enough to start looking forward to it.

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    1. srtilis
      Thanks
      You have put if perfectly. The though of the next seasons joys and challenges are already working into my mind, and I look forward to seeing them come through to reality.
      Walks in winter are enjoyable, ones pace is picked up to help you keep warm, but still slow enough to observe your surroundings.

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  10. Great stuff!

    I also find that lower standards make winter fishing more laid back. That, or it leads to focusing on cold toes and numb fingers...

    Pretty brown, Alan!

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    1. Casting Across
      Thanks
      Matthew, it is laid back for sure. If a trout is taken it's a plus. Cold body parts soon highlight the outing.

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