Sunday, January 14, 2018

Some "Not So" Forgotten Flies

Good morning. I started with a filling breakfast consisting of sausage and gravy over a biscuit.

Last week or so I was shown a photo of a soft-hackle salmon fly...that started a mini-obsession. Since that photo I have done some searching to find out if there were others out there, by others I mean soft-hackle salmon flies. I located a source of some interesting patterns, that source was my own desk. Back in 2001 Jeanette gave me a book for Christmas, the title of it was "Forgotten Flies", an awesome publication of 550 pages of some of the most beautiful flies ever. Glancing through I found some patterns that I liked and set out to tie them. The materials which I do not have for these patterns were substituted but the likeness was still there.

The hooks were not available to me, but thanks to an Ohio gentleman who sent me some of his stash, along with some frugal purchases made elsewhere I managed to put these irons in a vise and I created some beautiful patterns.

This fly is called "Green Body Pheasant"


This fly is called, "Squirrel and Pheasant"


"Yellow Body Pheasant"


"Blue Body Pheasant"


"Royal Pheasant"
The common theme to all of these flies is size 8 hooks, silk floss bodies and a collar of pheasant. While they are not small stream flies, they would be at home on larger rivers.









26 comments:

  1. Brk Trt, nice looking salmon soft hackles. I would think that if you down sized the hook & shank size you could covert these patterns to small stream streamer, no?

    Anyway, great post.........Phil

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. DRYFLYGUY
      Thanks
      Phil yes, tying these on smaller hooks would work. I have some TMC's that I used for woolly buggeres and may try them.

      Delete
  2. I would run the Squirrel and Pheasant, riffle hitched, through the runs in the NYD stream... and the spring creek. We both know there are brookies big enough to eat a size 8 in those streams!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. RM Lytle
      Thanks
      Rowan those two streams have produced several brookies that would no doubt chase that fly. Your method would add to the effectiveness of it also.

      Delete
  3. Nice patterns nicely tied, Alan. I may tie some up in a larger size to try for Atlantic salmon broodstock in the Shetucket. I haven't fished there much but the only salmon I witnessed caught was by a youngster fishing near me with a heavy spinning outfit and using a rapala that was at least 8 inches long. Go figure?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. John Dornik
      Thanks
      John I have fished there a few times, going back to the late 90's. I caught a few on large Mickey Finn's.
      They say that fishing for stripers below the Greenville dam in spring has yielded a few good salmon.

      Delete
  4. Sausage, gravy and biscuits...oh my! Beautiful flies Alan. Can you give me quick lesson on fishing them?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Howard Levett
      Thanks
      Howard you fish these flies as you would any wet fly, quartering downstream. Or you could fish them Like I do, any way you feel like. Experiment.

      Delete
  5. As always Alan, very nice tyings.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Alan
    Beautiful flies. Like the squirrel and pheasant fly. Bet it might work in the Farmington!!!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. TROUT1
      Thanks
      Pete I know just where I'd like to swing it. It's a spot called B. Bridge. That place owes me a big one.

      Delete
  7. Love the flies Alan and the biscuit and gravy looks delicious...

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Doug Korn, Fly Tyer
      Thanks
      Doug as one chef to another I appreciate it.
      And one fly tyer to another...thanks.

      Delete
  8. Stunning flies. Very nice work.

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    Replies
    1. Paul Haan
      Thanks
      Paul your comment is much appreciated.

      Delete
  9. Lovely renditions, Alan. I prefer the ones with the longer hackle, but that just a personal thing. All parts of each one are very well tied, but I'm most impressed with your work on the heads. Props.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. William Shuck
      Thanks
      Bill I am searching out some longer hackles, a show coming this week may produce some. I'm also trying to source some size 10 hooks in the same style as the ones I'm using.

      Delete
  10. Breakfast looks great!

    I've learned something here today with your salmon flies. I'm going to have to tie up some Royal Pheasant. I love the look and the coachman-style streamer is a hit for me over here in fall.

    New fly to the arsenal. Looks great!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. spike
      Thanks
      I tied these flies on somewhat large hooks, especially since most of my fishing is small streams...but come late spring, early summer I'll swing them in a larger river and see what takes hold.

      Delete
  11. Alan
    Anyone of these patterns would attract a savage attack, nice work at the vice---what a way to get the day started; biscuits, gravy and a hot cup of coffee!!!! Thanks for sharing

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Bill Trussell
      Thanks
      Bill I have hopes of these flies hooking up some trout on the Farmington later this year.
      That's a nice treat at breakfast once in awhile.

      Delete
  12. Beautiful flies, Alan. I anticipate reading about a big brown from the Farmington taking one of those this spring. That hearty breakfast sure looks good during this cold winter.

    Best,
    Sam

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    Replies
    1. Parachute Adams
      Thanks
      Sam I do hope those browns will be on my side come tryout time. I have to put more time on that river this year.

      Delete
  13. Beautiful flies and that biscuit and gravy is just no way to start off a story... Haha. Now, I'm going to the grocery store!

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    Replies
    1. The River Damsel
      Thanks
      Emily I've seen some of your culinary creations, especially your cookies and they are simple awesome.

      Delete