Thursday, May 10, 2018

The "John Storey" A Fly That Earned A Place.....

The John Storey, a fly that was brought to my attention here on SSR's by a follower. John from the Two Terriers had mentioned it saying it had been a very productive fly for him in the U.K. His mention brought several responses from other readers. Bill Shuck tied up a couple of versions of the John Storey, one wet and one dry. Alistair also provided me with some history of the fly in the form of writings.

So I tied up a John Storey dry fly and over the last few weeks gave it a tryout on some small streams. I'll let the series of photos give you a view of how it worked. I'll just add this. The John Storey will hold a place in my box.

























28 comments:

  1. I see your brookies gave the John Storey a 5 star review. I've got all the materials lined up and ready to tie a handful. Can't wait for the water levels up here to drop enough to fish it.

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    Replies
    1. mike
      Thanks
      Mike I hope it is soon....the fly does get a trouts attention.

      Delete
  2. In fishing for native brook trout there is a rule that almost always holds true:

    If the fly has peacock herl, the fish will take it.

    I'd bet you could wrap straight peacock on a wet fly hook, fish it like an emerger, and catch plenty of fish. Same as a dry. Wrap a few strands and treat it with gink and slay brookies all day.

    The added dressings certainly make the offering more enticing and visible but there is something magic about peacock on a brook trout fly.

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    1. Anonymous
      Thanks
      I will totally agree with you on your assessments. Peacock is a wonderful material, sort of a magic feather.

      Delete
  3. Bonanza! Wonder why this pattern is pretty much unknown in the USA.

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    Replies
    1. William Shuck
      Thanks
      Bill that's a good question. Maybe it's to effective?

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  4. That has made my day, excellent. The estate gamekeeper at home in North Yorkshire fished it pretty well the whole season, I'm delighted it worked so well for you. Lovely pictures as always. Best wishes, John

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    Replies
    1. The Two Terriers
      Thanks
      John it has a permanent place in my fly box, so it will be used all year...reports will follow.

      Delete
  5. Nice tie again Alan, I user the John Storey often over here and its a very successful pattern on the Dales river for both trout & grayling.

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    Replies
    1. George
      Thanks
      I figured you would have first hand knowledge of this fly.

      Delete
  6. That is a great looking fly and well tied. I can see why the trout like it so much. Peacock herl is such a great fly material.

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    1. Parachute Adams
      Thanks
      Sam look what peacock herl has done for so many other trout patterns...love the Royals.

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  7. Alan , very nice fly, I've never seen one before . Definitely going to add that one . Anything peacock and brown get my interest. The trout are beautiful, but I kinda like the tree branch you caught. Lol. Thanks for the pattern.

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    Replies
    1. Brad Basehore
      Thanks
      Brad I know the Storey will work for you. Most trout have never seen one before.
      I have been taking photos of flies in the brush for some time. It is a part of every outing I make.

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  8. Alan
    Super nice pattern, it reminds me of the gnat; with this fly fishing it dry, one has advantage of seeing the fly much better with the color added. Thanks for sharing
    P.S. Can't wait to try the Salars Nemssis on the Sip during my next vist---thanks for giving me the chance to use it!

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    Replies
    1. Bill Trussell
      Thanks
      Bill the beauty of the John Storey is that it can represent many "bugs" that are about on our streams.
      I will be interested in how those Sipsey rainbows react to it.

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  9. Kind of reminds me of an ant or beetle. Very buggy looking Alan.

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    Replies
    1. Howard Levett
      Thanks
      Howard I think the trout feel the same.

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  10. Hadn't heard of this little fly before..Alan.. Effective as it appears I may have to tie a few..... The Brookies do seem to approve. What is it about peacock? Any fly with peacock material incorporated seems to always be a winner....

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    Replies
    1. Doug Korn
      Thanks
      Doug the brookies love it. I have to test it on the browns next.
      Peacock= fish.

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  11. A properly buggy little fly. I suspect it would be very productive on the smaller boggy streams in Maine and New Hampshire when their aren't many big mayflies about.

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    1. RM Lytle
      Thanks
      Rowan looks like those bugs we see about here.
      A very suggestive fly.

      Delete
  12. Hi Alan,
    Those are some amazingly coloured trout....
    I am thinking I should now include a few John Storey's in my box like the'Old Boys' at my Club here in Yorkshire.
    This is one of the things I love about fly fishing, the good will and flow of information between patrons of this wonderful sport.
    Thanks
    Alistair

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    Replies
    1. Anonymous
      Thanks
      Alistair, that slot you reserve for a John Storey will be well worth it. No dust will settle on it for sure.
      We all gain from each other.

      Delete
  13. Alan
    I guess that fly works as evidenced by all the beautiful brook trout you have in this post.

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    Replies
    1. TROUT1
      Thanks
      Pete the brookies took to it rather rapidly. Now to try it on a few browns.

      Delete
  14. Peacock herl is a ´╣░staple for Pacific NW tyers. Love the blogspot. I've been following for a few months now and fish small streams exclusively for coastal cutthroat and rainbows.

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    Replies
    1. Matthew Harding
      Thanks
      Welcome.
      NW small stream fanatic, there must be plenty of action in your neck of the woods. Beautiful area.

      Delete