Wednesday, September 12, 2018

One of my better days.....

Monday and Monday night we had some pretty decent rains. This was well needed and I was anxious to see the stream levels, as well as how the fishing would be. Small streams rise quickly and fall almost as fast. In each stage the stream can become somewhat dirty and cloudy but will usually clear up before to long. The places to fish when this clearing process is happening are the riffles. It is these areas where the cobble bottom and faster flow clean the water to almost perfect conditions. Such was the case yesterday when I took to the woods in search of some willing brookies. The air was damp with the spattering of rain from time to time. A few instances the sky brightened for a minute and soon the clouds took control.



The streams bottom doing its work of clearing the water.


The brookies were active with several taken in a few minutes.


Now looking at this section of stream it seems to shout "brook trout hiding here" a near perfect place to hold and ambush a meal. The fly drifted near the undercut and a fish rose and missed, but continued to follow the fly as I drew it in and swiping at it again. I waited a few minutes before I cast again, and this time the fish was on. I could feel the power of the fish as it wen straight for the nasty stuff along the bank. My thoughts were of a good sized brook trout, but as I turned the fish I could see it was not a brookie but a brown. That brown owned this section and was not going to let a 5' 3wt fiberglass rod take him in, and for the most part he had the upper hand. The only issue that crossed my mind was if the hook would hold....


...it did and this beautiful wild brown was at my feet. As he lay there I reached for him, I slid my hand under him and lifted him. A quick photo and as I placed him in the water I could see the fly had come out as the fish lay in the water before I lifted him up. A few moments later he swam off.


These are the places my friends....


...where the wild jewels are found.


More on this fly later.


Beauty abounds.












34 comments:

  1. Hi Alan, That Brown looks very well fed. The Brookies not so much. That Brown may have turned "cannibal" which they are wont to do.

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    Replies
    1. John Dornik
      Thanks
      John I feel your right. I'm not sure the browns focus on the brookies as their prime feed, but they enjoy enjoy them. The stream is also full of dace.

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  2. Alan, excellent trip report, lovely brown trout and great photos as always.... lots of blue lines out there...

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    Replies
    1. Doug Korn
      Thanks
      Doug lots of blue lines close to home which I'm grateful for.

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  3. One of your "better days" pretty much has to be spectacular, Alan. What a lovely surprise to find that sizable wild brown in that little stream.
    But, as John suggests, he is big enough to wreak havoc with the little brookies in there as well.

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    Replies
    1. William Shuck
      Thanks
      Bill so happy for days like this.
      I have taken a couple of like browns in the past and I don't see any negative impact on the brookies.

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  4. Replies
    1. Mark Kautz
      Thanks
      Well thank you Mark.

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  5. Wow, very nice fish. What pattern did he fall to?

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    Replies
    1. mike
      Thanks
      Mike the fly pictured. I'll post a report on the pattern.

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  6. well done alan, that brownie is a right fatty.

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    Replies
    1. George
      Thanks
      George I don't suspect he missed to many meals.

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  7. Alan
    One nice brown trout for sure, I have a feeling it is not the only brown trout in that stream. I see the banks are covered with lots of wild fern, which comes back every year. Thanks for sharing

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    Replies
    1. Bill Trussell
      Thanks
      Bill for a fact he's not the only brown in that stream. I have caught several over the years, as did Mark, and Kirk.
      The ferns are so green, beautiful.

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  8. That is a heck of a nice brown trout out of that small stream! They are so strong same as the native brook trout, I bet that was a hand full to bring to hand in those small confines. Beautiful red spots.

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    Replies
    1. Parachute Adams
      Thanks
      Sam he owned that stretch of stream and he let me know it. It has bee a good couple of years weather wise on these streams and it's paying off. It should be a great fall.

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    2. The Swift treated me to several beautiful brookies tonight and one brown that ran right at me that made a high leap and got off. Dark at 7 now, not too many days left for fishing after work. It sure was fun tonight though.

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    3. Sam what a great way to call an end to the day, brookies and a brown. Yes the daylight is dwindling enjoy while you can.

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  9. that's a proper little beck, that water must sound fantastic. regards, John

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    Replies
    1. The Two Terriers
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      John such sweet music as only nature can play.

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  10. Great report and please keep posting! I recently moved about 90-120 minutes away from my favorite wild trout waters so I will take all I can get.

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    Replies
    1. Unknown
      Thanks
      I intend to post for a bit longer, I have such wonderful followers. A couple of hours to get to heaven on earth..

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  11. Beautiful creek and trout, Alan. The colours on all those fish are astounding. Any trout is a thing of beauty
    I'm still hoping for the day when I can tempt some of those brookie jewels.
    I'm intending to hit the Badger some time today. It's running clear and I'll try out those Hornberg flies that arrived yesterday.It's an interesting looking fly. With the hackle and feathers it could be many things to many trout. Would you suggest drifting it downstream as a dry then twitching it back up when it sinks? I like multipurpose flies. I've even fished my favourite wet fly--the black woolly worm as a dry. Sort of like a big Red Tag--another favourite fly.
    Kind Regards,
    Steve.

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    Replies
    1. Steve Hynes
      Thanks
      Steve I've been told the Hornberg represent everything a trout likes to eat. I fish it like you said, dry at first and then retrieve it back wet. Try it in different sizes as well as various speeds when retrieving.

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  12. I fished a Hornberg on the Badger this morning. No luck but I do like this fly. It floats well as a dry and with a flick it goes under the surface. A couple of false casts and it's floating again. A very versatile fly and I can see why it became a popular classic fly. I'll have another play tomorrow.
    Kind Regards,
    Steve.

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    Replies
    1. Steve stay with the Hornberg, there's a big brown waiting for it.

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  13. Hi Alan
    That Brownie certainly is a trophy for that size stream.
    The fly looks interesting, I am looking forward to hearing more about it in future post.
    Alistair

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    Replies
    1. Alistair Corbishley
      Thanks
      Alistair the browns in that stream are usually smaller, but a bigger one is not uncommon.
      That's a fly I could see working in your waters.

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  14. The season here will end in just over two weeks! Please share the details ASAP so I can try one before we close out until next year!

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    Replies
    1. Alistair the post will be tomorrow. It's a pretty easy tie.

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  15. Another wonderful post! The gorgeous pictures and thoughtful comments always brighten my day, especially when I am stuck in the office all day! Great post! I, too, would appreciate info on the fly in the picture.
    Regards,
    Jed

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    Replies
    1. Jedidiah Green
      Thanks
      Jedidiah I'm always happy to brighten ones day.
      I'll post the details on the fly tomorrow.

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  16. Drop dead gorgeous Alan! I never grow tired of these views! Thank you for taking us along when you visit these "Thin, Blue Lines!"
    Doug

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    Replies
    1. Dougsden
      Thanks
      Doug it's my pleasure...some beautiful reports on those thin blue lines coming up.

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