Saturday, August 10, 2019

Still bumming around the Farmington....

I have been poking about the Farmington these last weeks. My small streams have been given a rest. I do miss them and have been monitoring a few and I'm glad to say they are doing OK. My trips to the river have been about three hours in duration and have been very fruitful. Many hook-ups and some luckily to hand. One outing I sat along the bank and observed the goings on of life along the river. Three types of ducks, lots of geese. A fantastic flight of a mature bald eagle. A whitetail deer crossing the river, and heaps of fresh moose droppings. You don't have to catch fish to have a complete outing.



Cardinal flowers, the first sighting this year. These flowers are like brook trout in the fact that a camera can't catch the true color of these blooms.


This was a nice rainbow that took the fly in some pretty fast water. He was a fighter leaping several times before giving up.


Can you identify the fly?


Pretty nice view at 6am.


Typical Farmington brook trout.


Clear, shallow water hardly the place to find brown trout. A well drifted Partridge and Orange soft-hackle did the trick.


I think I like having the Farmington so close.











15 comments:

  1. Alan, having the Farmy so close for you and the Swift so close to me this time of year is a real gift. Tailwater is still cold and in a safe zone to catch trout and not stress them out bringing them to hand. That fly looks like one of those tomahs you tied recently. Well done on your three hours out, which is about my limit too these days. Amazing what one sees when sitting on the bank just taking it all in.
    Best, Sam

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    Replies
    1. Sam
      Thanks
      Sam both those tailwaters are a blessing in times like late summer. Cold water and very active fish can really be exciting. It's a Tomah Joe. The eagle really impressed me, just moving so gracefully through the sky.

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  2. Maybe I should tie up a few Tomah Joes? Amazingly thin water for a Brownie.

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    Replies
    1. billp
      Thanks
      Bill they work here so why not in the southwest.
      He was there because of the abundance of food and the lack of skilled anglers, just kidding.

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  3. "You can observe a lot by just watching" by guess who

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    Replies
    1. John Dornik
      Thanks
      John you have me stumped on that one. But who ever said it really nailed it.

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  4. Bigger creek, bigger fish? Seems like it.

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    Replies
    1. Mark Kautz
      Thanks
      Mark quite true...lots of stuff on the menu in that creek.

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  5. Good times and great photos & flys. I trekked down the middle section of my home river further than ever before. After almost 9 hrs...nothing, nothing, nothing. That's when you have to appreciate all that you can see around you. Glad your outing was productive.

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    Replies
    1. Matt Harding
      Thanks
      Wow Matt you have staying power. Nine hours is a long time. My day today was frustrating with quite a few hook-ups that resulted in no fish to hand. Luckily I found a few willing brookies that obliged me with a few photos.

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    2. Not sure what it is about this time of year, but I had several hook ups today also, but nothing brought to net on the Swift. A hard fighting brookie that took line out at one point made its way off too. I'm good with that, just feeling them on the line is good.

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    3. Sam it's funny how some days you can't get that tension on your hook-set to hold those fish. Solace comes from knowing they liked your fly.

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  6. Alan
    Another great day on the Farmington, can't identify the fly but I have seen it in some of your previous post. Thanks for sharing

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