Thursday, October 29, 2020

Concerns, eased somewhat....

Last August I visited this stream and was shocked. The section you see here was nothing but rocks and puddles. I passed a couple of hikers on the trail that looked at me somewhat funny when they saw a fishing rod in my hand. The summer was not kind in many places in Connecticut. Rainfall was at a premium and streams suffered. But there were also pockets of the state that benefited from thunderstorms that put down an ample amount of rain. This is one stream that did not see those storms.

So when I fished here this week I did not know what I would find. Several places were changed with some of them dramatically. I found a familiar run and tossed my fly into it. I was thrilled when within a few seconds I felt the strike of a fish. The fish was a tiny brook trout. it stayed on for a few seconds and then departed. Moving upstream I encountered several more brookies and soon my first one to hand.

 

 

Moving further upstream I came to a familiar section we have referred to as the "black hole". This hole had the reputation of giving up a few big brookies in the past. A streamer was tied on and sent out seeking. The bright fly became lost in the dark water of the stream. A violent strike took place and a good battle was in process. My experience over the years has been that when a big brookie is hooked they will head for the bottom and sulk a bit and then find every bit of cover to attempt to rid themselves of the fly and that's what this guy did.

Impressed, yes I was. A survivor beyond belief. Within an eye blink he was gone back into the "black hole"....

Hey guys want a simple filling and satisfying meal? Toast points covered with cream of mushroom soup. You can add ground beef if you like. On a cold day when this is served hot, "man oh man"


 

22 comments:

  1. Replies
    1. Unknown
      Thanks
      They are being saved right now.

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  2. Really glad to see the streams are coming back to life, and I'm always amazed that these fish find holes to swim in and survive. Hopefully we get a wetter summer next year. Next thing you know, we'll have ice on our guides!

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    1. Andrew D
      Thanks
      Andrew the tenacity for life these fish have shown me for so many years just can't be put into words, at least by me. They find a way. Raining now, snow later...ice in the guides a real possibility.

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  3. Nice Brookie, Alan. Once again, good thing I've already eaten breakfast. That toast looks wonderful. My kind of meal.

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    1. Mark Kautz
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      Mark it's so easy to make. Most times I add meat be it hamburg or sausage.

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  4. I'm going to make my way over to that rocky creek off of 6 that we spoke of, last visit it was barely a trickle and left me greatly concerned for the beauties I know we're in there.

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    1. Nathan Camp
      Thanks
      Nate I would be really interested in that report. These wild ones are tough, I hope they pulled through.
      I have one more stream that I'm going to check this weekend.

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  5. That's wonderful to see, Alan. It's amazing to think something so fragile can be so tenacious. They're tougher than we give them credit for.

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    1. mike
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      Mike tough they are but also they require our help. In bringing summer situations like the one we just had to the focus of others will strengthen the knowledge of others.

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  6. Alan
    Wow, that toast/mushroom soup dish looks delicious. Got to give it a try, a quality brook troutfor sure. Thanks for sharing

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    1. Bill Trussell
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      Bill comfort food for wintertime....

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  7. G'Day Alan,
    Fine looking brook trout and that second one was a big bloke. Any idea on how old he might be? The fly--a Mickey Finn?
    It always amazes me how a small stream can recover from adverse conditions. During the prolonged drought period we had a few years ago in OZ,the Grace Burn that runs through my town turned into a series of stagnant pools with barely a trickle between them. Seemingly no signs of life. But after the drought broke,the trout and native fishes magically reappeared--none of these were stocked--these streams haven't been stocked with trout since the 1960's. I dont know where they sheltered but it shows how resilient and tenacious they can be.
    Our COVID19 restrictions have been eased a fair bit. We are now allowed to fish provided it's within 25 km's of home. This distance limit is supposed to be scrapped in a week or so. Looking forward to heading up to some favourite spots a little ways from home. Small Stream Reflections helped get me through our lock down. Thanks, yet again, Alan. You and the blog are a legend!
    Kindest Regards,
    Steve.

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    1. Steve
      Thanks
      Steve the fly is an Edson Tiger. Wild trout know their environment and make use of what they have and how to survive in it. Covid is something that has taken a toll on us in many ways. But like the trout we will adapt and overcome it. Back to fishing mate....

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  8. Brk Trt, wow!! That brookie is a real dandy. The toast points and cream of mushroom soup looks really good. That meal kind'a brings me back to a much simpler time of my youth, and sometimes simple isn't a bad thing.
    Thanks for letting us share.

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    Replies
    1. DRYFLYGUY
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      Phil that stream the "black hole" in particular has given up some beauties in the past. Most times we tend to over complicate things that don't need to be over complicated. As you say a simpler time of your youth.

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  9. Hi Alan,

    Time and again when Mother Nature is extreme, we are shown just how resilient these fish are. They just need protection from the worst of human activities and they will cling on to survive and prosper whenever they get chance.

    Mushroom soup is food for the soul and not just for sustenance!

    Thanks

    Alistair

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    1. Alistair
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      Alistair we are our own worst enemies and that includes the trout. Some real bonehead decisions of the past caused some of the problems we now face in our trout streams.
      Let's all step back and have some comfort food.

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  10. Beautiful brookies and good looking chow, Alan! What a great precipitation event we just had too! Blue lines should be in good shape for a while now.

    Regards, Sam

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    1. Sam
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      Sam the tanks are full and that's great news. Now if we can get some rain perhaps weekly to help keep levels as they are it will be awesome.

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  11. Alan,
    This post, like all the others, is so cool! Right down to the delicious looking cream of mushroom soup over toast! Wow! My wife and I have been picking field mushrooms lately! They are the best they've been in years! We have had abundant rain recently which caused the mushrooms to pop! I am thinking about slicing some fresh ones and putting over your entree!
    I am glad to see that Connecticut is getting some beneficial rains and snow too! Our ponds and streams are way down as well! Bring on the rains!
    Dougsden

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    1. Dougsden
      Thanks
      Doug fresh mushrooms are delicious. Just to fry them is an injustice. You can also doctor the soup by adding fresh cream, herbs and a real good bakery bread. It will make your cold day warm.

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