Wednesday, September 12, 2012

Waters of Color

There are many small streams in Connecticut that hold wild brook trout. This one is a special one, I shouldn't say that because all of them are. What I should say is that its surroundings are special. Its located in northwest Connecticut and its a freestone stream. I don't know its origin but can give a guess, some spring fed swamp, with help along the way. The true beauty of this stream is the hemlock forest it flows through. The smell of a hemlock forest is hard to describe, it can be so sweet with that evergreeen fragrance, and also have that boggy, peat odor almost like an old ash tray.

The stream was flowing nicely over stones, logs and various other obstacles. A check of the water temp gave a reading of 58 degrees. I tied on a Bomber and started prospecting. The fly was hit repeatedly but by small fish who could not be hooked. After thinking a bit I changed to a wet fly, a Picket Pin, and sent it through a pool. The fly was met with the same result of hits from small fish.

I continued to fish under a canopy of large hemlocks, which at times made the area as dark as night. I came to a pool, the water flowing over a boulder and several sunken logs. The water color seemed to look like iced tea. That swift run is where I found the bigger brook trout. They were holding in the fast water behind any boulder or tree that gave cover.

The tannin waters of this stream, cold and clean.


Wild brook trout. Most of the fish taken were this size, but I'm confident there are a few larger.


Again I am so appreciative of such places, and of the special rewards they give.



CLICK IMAGES TO ENLARGE


18 comments:

  1. Your description of the smell of a hemlock forest is spot on. The second picture with the tannin stained waters looks like a neon sign in brookie colors saying "brook trout" live here. Nice post!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Kiwi,
      Thanks.
      I know you are familiar with such things. Now that you mention it, it does say "brook trout".

      Delete
  2. I love those types of settings and the private moments between you and wild trout..it's a communion of souls..

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. penbayman,
      Thanks.
      Very well said my friend.

      Delete
  3. Certainly color Al!!! Fall colors!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. TROUT1,
      Thanks.
      It's closing in on us, and I'm loving it as you certainly are.

      Delete
  4. the stream and brookies look stunning, thanks for sharing.

    ReplyDelete
  5. The senses sure get a workout in places like that. Glad you were rewarded for such effort.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Hey Alan. It'd be hard not to love a place like that.

    Mark

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Mark Kautz,
      Thanks.
      It's great, and I know you would enjoy it.

      Delete
  7. Alan
    What type waders do you use when fishing these type streams? Those are some outstanding looking streams. Thanks for the comment

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Bill Trussell,
      Thanks.
      Most of the time I wear hiking boots or hiking shoes. I rock hop and fish from the bank. At times I'll put on hip boots.

      Delete
  8. Hi Alan!

    Lovely stream as usual and the inhabitants are like jewels. Looks very much like some of the streams I've been fishing here in Sweden. Small lovely streams in the middle of the forest. Enjoy your outings! Sad to say my situation hasn't allowed me to do much fishing. Hope things get better. They can hardly get worse at least.

    Kind regards,
    Mats Olsson

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The Jassid Man,
      Thanks.
      Kind words my friend.
      I hope your problems will resolve themselves, and all can be well.

      Delete