Monday, September 10, 2012

Wonderful Happenings

Yesterday morning we arrived at a stream that is rumored to hold a few wild brook trout. Saturdays rains were finished and from the looks of the small stream the rain was of little help. A check of the water temp showed it was 62 degrees, and it stayed much the same as we moved upstream. The air was cool and the forest damp, the smells of nature are many everything from decaying matter to the fragrant pine and hemlock.




So many colors along the stream. No cultivation here, only wild.


An elk hair caddis was given the first assignment and compleated it.


There are lots of places to escape to. And they also provide an excellent place to ambush a meal.

I came upon a long glassy pool. It was jammed up at one end from a log and some debris. I had put on a hopper and was about to let it drift when a brook trout was startled from the movement of the fly. The trout shot upstream and was gone for the day so I thought. No sooner than the time I finished my thought this brook trout races back down stream past me and nails the hopper.

As I held and admired the wild beauty for a few moments I wondered how a fish like this could make it in such cramped waters. As I placed the hopper in the hook holder I said I don't know how he managed to survive, I was so very happy he did.




CLICK IMAGES TO ENLARGE








24 comments:

  1. Very nice. What a beautiful fish.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. RKM,
      Thanks.
      He was not about to let that hopper go by.

      Delete
  2. All brookies are beautiful but I really like the second one.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Kiwi,
      Thanks.
      He was king of that pool.

      Delete
  3. This comment has been removed by the author.

    ReplyDelete
  4. I caught a spelling error......

    Hi Alan,

    It is amazing that a fish that small would go after something as big as an elk hair fly.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Ed,
      Thanks.
      If it fits, and looks like food they will take it no matter what size the fish is.

      Delete
  5. Great looking "new" stream - sounds like an awesome time of fishing!

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    Replies
    1. Will,
      Thanks.
      They're all "new" streams. It was a great few hours for sure.

      Delete
  6. Looks like they're dressed up in all their fall splendor. I'll be heading out tomorrow for a short fishing vacation and am very much hoping to make the acquaintance of a few of those beautiful brookies myself.

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    Replies
    1. HighPlainsFlyFisher,
      Thanks.
      They're starting to show there stuff.
      Good luck on your vacation.

      Delete
  7. Gorgeous...my favorite time of year. It always amazes me too, how they survive in their very small quarters of this world. But they do. And I am thankful.

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    Replies
    1. e.m.b.,
      Thanks.
      It is a grand time of year. You and I are in agreement on the brook trout.

      Delete
  8. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  9. I think that you answered this:
    "...I wondered how a fish like this could make it in such cramped waters."
    with this:
    "He was not about to let that hopper go by."

    The deep, mature jaw implies slow growth. An old fish. In those waters, his meals are few and far between. A high-calorie hopper is too valuable to not chase.

    Looks like a magical place -- thanks for sharing, as always.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. voyageur pursuits,
      Thanks.
      You seem to know your wild brook trout. It is probably a three year old fish. There hostile meager habitat ages them rapidly.

      Delete
  10. I just cant imagine how you handle a fly rod in such tight areas. Well done! thanks for the pics of a great looking fish.

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    Replies
    1. Savage,
      Thanks.
      It's really not that difficult.

      Delete
  11. Beautiful stream and great looking Brookies.

    Mark

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    Replies
    1. Mark Kautz,
      Thanks.
      That stream was outstanding that morning.

      Delete
  12. Hello, Alan. Your pictures of your time on a small stream are remarkable. I agree with e.m.b., my favorite time of the year to be on the small streams in my area. Beautiful fall colors and vivid colored trout like this one.

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    Replies
    1. Mel Moore,
      Thanks.
      Yes sir it seems as if nature is trying to out do itself.

      Delete
  13. Looks like time well spent. It can be surprising what survives in those trickles.

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    Replies
    1. Bill,
      Thanks.
      Yes very well spent. It always amazes what's there.

      Delete