Friday, January 18, 2013

A River Story

This sign marks the access to a river. As it states there are no motor vehicles allowed accept in winter. At that time the snow machines are allowed to use the trail to cross the countryside. The river is the Rangeley and it's a river that is not very long. It originates from the outlet of Rangeley Lake in Oquossoc and flows to Cupsuptic Lake. The river offers some fine fishing for brook trout and salmon. The spring, and fall seem to be best times to fish it and I prefer fall.

There are few places along its course to access the water, there is dense fir and hardwood stands that do not allow you to get close. Once in the water it's an easy stream to wade.

This bridge crosses the river at a point where it nears Cupsuptic lake. The bridge is for snowmobiles. On the other side there is a picnic table, a great place to have lunch.


This land is protected, so it will remain wild. By the way one must always be on the lookout, there are many moose and black bears in the area.


This is the bridge from downstream, the section I love to fish. It was here one autumn that I had an encounter with a beautiful fish.


Just under the bridge, you can see the wood rail of the bridge in the photo. There are large boulders that provide resting areas for spawning fish. It was here that I tossed a large Hornberg. The fly hit the water and danced in the swirling eddy behind the rock. In a moment a brook trout rose smacked the fly, and hen he felt steel he was off to the race. He was down and across the river in seconds. When I gained control I could tell the trout was a big one. The battle went on for a while and as I gained more line I could see his form. That was the last I saw of this fish. It was then that the tippet gave and he went on his way.

Over the course of an anglers life he looses many fish, but there are those few he never forgets.

The Hornberg

This is one of the best flies for taking brook trout and salmon. I fish them in Maine and as well as here in Connecticut.


25 comments:

  1. Some flies are just inherently "buggy." Certainly the Horberg would be one.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. tenkara ambassador,
      Thanks.
      It sure does represent what you want it to be.

      Delete
  2. Brk Trt,
    I love this post because it draws up personal memories of my own of spending time in what I call "gods country".

    The Hornberg is a great fly! My personal most proven favorite go-to dry fly for Salmon & trout of all kinds is the Parmachene Wulff which was originated in maine many years ago. Its an unknown pattern by many, though the few who do is a different story.

    What a great post you gave us for this time of the year...........Phil

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. DRYFLYGUY,
      Thanks.
      I looked up that Parmacheene Wulff. Nice fly.
      Where did you get the red and white hackles?

      Delete
  3. Brk Trt - great post and pictures as always. Maine is one New England state that I have not fished in but is on the "short list"

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    Replies
    1. Mark,
      Thanks.
      I know you would love it there.

      Delete
  4. That is one of the best tied Hornbergs I've ever seen! Did you treat the wing with anything or is it just set that perfectly?

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    Replies
    1. Bill,
      Thanks.
      Most times a little cement is needed to get the wing to conform. And there are times when they just conform naturally.

      Delete
  5. Alan
    That is one good looking stream to fish. I would think one would need a wading staff when fishing there. I am really impressed with the Hornberg. Thanks for sharing

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    Replies
    1. Bill Trussell,
      Thanks.
      Actually the stream is not to bad for wading, although a staff never hurts.

      Delete
  6. When I saw the "fly fishermen park here" I thought there was a little discrimination going on there, but I saw the "fly fishing only" sign and immediately understood. Didn't want to be dissing our spin fishermen out there.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Mark Kautz,
      Thanks.
      The lakes in the region are open to all types of fishing, but the rivers are mostly fly fishing.

      Delete
  7. I thank you for sharing those autumn photos of an absolutely gorgeous area. Helped to make my morning reading a little better! Kinda wishing leaves were back on the trees....

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    Replies
    1. Casey,
      Thanks.
      I'm glad I was able to brighten you day. Spring is a mere 60 days or so away.

      Delete
  8. You sold me Brk Trt..a definite on my Definite To Fish List for this upcoming season...

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    Replies
    1. penbayman,
      Thanks.
      I hope you make it up there.

      Delete
  9. Such a beautiful place...I'm truly jealous.

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    Replies
    1. cofisher,
      Thanks.
      It's beautiful. I'm sure Colorado is also very much a place to see.

      Delete
  10. Brk Trt!! Once again a great post and pics !!! That area is beautiful!!

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  11. Heading back up there this Fall...these images make we want to go sooner. Thanks for sharing.

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    Replies
    1. Steve,
      Thanks.
      I'm glad your heading back, it will be here soon....hopefully.

      Delete
  12. Man, such beautiful rivers. Really enjoyed the last post. I should go visit my brother in Maine and look up the Rangely. Thanks for the tantalizing taste.

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    Replies
    1. Jim Yaussy Albright,
      Thanks.
      That's right, you do have family in the Pine Tree State.

      Delete
  13. gorgeous views! you fish. i'll stay right here and enjoy the scenery. :)

    ReplyDelete