Monday, January 21, 2013

Thin Blue Lines, and Winter Brookies

Some of the enjoyment of angling for wild trout is taking out maps and looking for those thin blue lines that may hold a few fish. Next is marking them and then doing some exploration. Winter is a fine time to do this, for the trees are void of leaves and the streams can be seen easily. Most times the streams found do not pan out as far as producing what your looking for, but it's winter and the exercise will do you good. But never give up on a new find, come spring and the stream thought to be barren in January is not so barren in April.

Such exploration took place Saturday when I took a old rod that I have not fished with in a long while, and a fly I had crafted to try. I set out for a piece of forest land with some blue lines I wanted to check. As I pulled on to the service road I could see the stream. It had the looks to be a good one.



The "Brokeback Bomber"
The fly I had tied on first was a variation of the Bomber, it's tied on a curved hook to give it a crippled look. I fished this fly for some time as I walked the new stream, fishing it in the runs and pools. It was not accepted. Tying on a wet fly and moving along I soon was met with that tug. Pulling back and fish "on" fish "off".

Winter time angling usually finds fish holding in the deeper slower pools. But again I was wrong. The trout were in the riffles. I love winter fishing.

As time moved by I realized I had only fished a small section of this blue line, a blue line that had been so good to me this winter day.


A special reward this winter day in January. Thin blue line wild brook trout.



CLICK IMAGES TO ENLARGE


43 comments:

  1. thats a nice plump fish for january!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Col,
      Thanks.
      The food sources in that stream seem adequate.

      Delete
  2. Sometimes half the fun of it is is just finding them. Even better when you catch something. Nice looking fish

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Swamp Yankee,
      Thanks.
      Very true. I enjoy walking a new stream.

      Delete
  3. Very nice fish- fishing or hunting is always a great excuse to explore.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Peter Patenaude,
      Thanks.
      Love the outdoors.

      Delete
  4. NIcely done...I particularly like the first image, tools of the trade. Next few days here in CT might require a heavier coat for a trip out!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Steve,
      Thanks.
      All that's needed to get the job done. A heavier coat for sure.

      Delete
    2. what set up do you use to fish such a stream?

      Delete
    3. Steve,
      I usually fish a TFO 6ft 2wt. It's been my small stream rod for some time. It's paired with an Orvis Trout LA reel. A great set up.
      In this post I used my Orvis Superfine Small Stream Special, 7ft 5wt., with Battenkill Reel.

      Delete
  5. Fishing a new stream is exciting, especially when you are rewarded with such a fine looking trout.

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    Replies
    1. brian,
      Thanks.
      That fish sure put a smile on my face.

      Delete
  6. Alan
    I am surprised the Brokeback didn't produce, the pattern has fish attractor tied all over it. Is that an undercut bank under that tree, it looks like a perfect area for a brook? From the looks of the reel seat on that fly rod you was using, tells me it was not a TFO. Thanks for sharing

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Bill Trussell,
      Thanks.
      I think that fly will do its job of fooling a few, perhaps as the weather and waters warm.
      No Bill it's not the TFO. It's an Orvis Small Stream Special. 7ft, 5wt. soft and sweet.

      Delete
  7. Looks like you ran across a very pretty thin blue line that holds some brookies. Nice work!

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    Replies
    1. Mark,
      Thanks.
      I just touched on that stream. There are a few more in that tract of forest that need checking out.

      Delete
  8. Looks like the back seat of my truck also.

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    Replies
    1. csoult,
      Thanks.
      Like most of us fly fishers.

      Delete
  9. That's a fatty brook trout, Brk Trt..

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. penbayman,
      Thanks.
      Healthy, and strong. A good sign.

      Delete
  10. Nothing more fun that exploring. Personally I prefer to do it in my truck and have been know to follow many a dirt road. Be surprised what you find.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Mark Kautz,
      Thanks.
      Most times your findings are worth the exploration.

      Delete
  11. Those thin blue lines are my favorite places to fish....I only wish I lived closer to more of them.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Kiwi,
      Thanks.
      Must be tough out on the Island.
      I'm fortunate to have some gems so close.

      Delete
  12. Winter fishing at it's finest! Beautiful fish Alan...

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. HighPlainsFlyFisher,
      Thanks.
      The outdoors at this time can be spectacular.

      Delete
  13. i have to appreciate the beauty of that fish. such beautiful color and patterns. :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. TexWisGirl,
      Thanks.
      Brook trout are of the same, but can be vastly different.

      Delete
  14. Nice creek and fish. I can't agree more with doing some R&D in the winter. With out the leaves you can see things that aren't visible in the summer.

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    Replies
    1. Kevin Frank,
      Thanks.
      Barren landscapes give up their secrets.

      Delete
  15. Most of the folks who have commented have spoken of the nice Brookie's that came to hand on this day. Personally, I really enjoyed just taking in the winter stream and dreaming I was there. Great work, Alan.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Rainbow Chaser,
      Thanks.
      You've said it well Mel.

      Delete
  16. Ok.....you pick a thin line on a map and catch a beautiful Brookie.

    You are no longer Professor but from here on you will be known as The Fish Whisperer. :)

    All kidding aside Alan, great stuff.

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    Replies
    1. Ed,
      Thanks.
      Sometimes they just happen to work out, most times they don't.
      Did you attend Marlborough?

      Delete
    2. Hi Alan,
      Yes I did make it to Marlboro and I stayed for about 90 minutes (3 times longer than the first I went a couple of years ago).
      I bought some flies and talked to some of the folks who were tying flies and selling books.
      I have to say that the flies you tie and post matched or surpassed the ones I saw at the show......

      Delete
  17. Ahhhh. Thanks. That first photo of the trout is a real gem.

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    Replies
    1. Jim Yaussy Albright,
      Thanks.
      I love getting photos of them in the water.

      Delete
  18. In the riffles, you say. These fish don't make any sense to me. Nice place, especially if it has more of those beauties in residence.

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    Replies
    1. RKM,
      Thanks.
      It's what keeps you coming back. Further exploration is needed. Perhaps when it warms some.

      Delete
  19. Amazing, Really its fantastic.Simply hang up with friends and family.

    ReplyDelete
  20. Thin blue lines
    and contour lines,
    tea leaves to be divined
    by a feverish angler's mind.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. tenkara ambassador,
      Thanks.
      Fine words friend.

      Delete