Tuesday, October 8, 2013

A New England Mountain Town

Stark is a quiet little town located in the mountains of northern New Hampshire. We have driven through it many times on route to Maine. This year while returning home we decided to stop and look around. In the first photo you can see how much the the values of New England are still in evidence today. The school, with children at recess. Playing on swings, running, and generally getting a good dose of fresh air. The school still has a bell tower with the bell that signals various school functions.

Near by, almost across the street from the school is the church. And there is a covered bridge crossing the Ammonoosuc river which is still in use today.

This is a man from this town that played a major role in our quest for independence. General John Stark led an army of farmer colonists to the Vermont town of Bennington. He then successfully defeated British forces decisively. The battle eventually led to the surrender of the British at Fort Ticonderoga.


Simple words that inspired victory.


This is a wild brook trout stream that feeds into the Ammonoosuc river. We walked along side it for a few miles enjoying the Autumn sights. I will return here next year to fish these waters.


CLICK IMAGES TO ENLARGE

20 comments:

  1. A quintessential New England town..you and I are so very fortunate to live in New England with it's rich history..

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    Replies
    1. penbayman,
      Thanks.
      Mike that's for sure.

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  2. Alan
    My wife and love small town settings like the one in the image above. A place like this should be preserved forever, because once an area like this is gone a piece of history is lost. Are there any Amish communities in that area?
    I am really impressed with that stream, just curious how would you fish the fast runs and breaks there? What fly pattern would you used? Thanks for sharing

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    Replies
    1. Bill Trussell,
      Thanks.
      There are no Amish in that area that I know of. A lot of work went into that streams restoration after a dam let go and totally destroyed it. I would fish it down and across. Fishing both wet and streamer flies. Dry fly patterns would be bombers, wullf flies, and various caddis.

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  3. Nice to see all the little towns in our wonderful country. Wouldn't mind fishing that little stream myself.

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    Replies
    1. Mark Kautz,
      Thanks.
      They are special places.

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  4. such a gorgeous area - such a quaint looking town.

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    1. TexWisGirl,
      Thanks.
      Folks still say Hi to you. Lots of flags there also.

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  5. I pass through Stark at least three or four times a month during spring and fall - one of my favorite places. I stopped there the end of September just about when you took these terrific pictures. I always encourage my clients to look up General John Stark and learn about his role at the Battle of Bunker Hill, in addition to the Bennington Battle. He was quite a guy.
    I also encourage you to research the story behind the beautiful stream you visited and the efforts by TU and others to restore it.

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    Replies
    1. Gerry,
      Thanks.
      We had just finished are trip to Rangeley and stopped. The stream I have knowledge of and quite thankful for all those who put it back together. I met a gent who owns a house there and we had quite a conversation about that stream.
      John Stark is one true American hero.

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  6. Good post...I like the addition of some colonial history.

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  7. Kiwi,
    Thanks.
    I love colonial history, there's so much of it right in our backyards.

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  8. Brk.

    As always a stunning new picture front cover, and a pleasing post. Thanks.

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    1. fishermanrichard,
      Thanks.
      Those brookies were very lovely that day.

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  9. Absolutely beautiful, it has always been a dream of mine to visit the northeast during fall. Someday, perhaps.

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    1. Atlas,
      Thanks.
      You just have to do it, you won't be sorry.

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  10. That looks like a great stream to drift a big bushy dry fly through, love the boulders and pocket water!

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    1. LQN,
      Thanks.
      It sure does. I hope to do just that next year.

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  11. Nice blog. I cannot wait to get out this weekend on my local waters - Nissitissit and Squannocook. Foliage is quite nice this year. Also, for history buffs. I recommend Nathianl Philbrick's "Bunker Hill" that came out this year - I could not put it down.

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    Replies
    1. Bill Norrish,
      Thanks.
      That's great, now is a perfect time to enjoy our fine Autumn weather and beauty. I may get out myself.
      I'll check out that title.

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