Thursday, May 1, 2014

Stream "X" and others.

Last Fall a good looking blue line was located on a map. The stream went far back into some state land and had what looked to be good access to water, which would give the stream nice flows. For what reason this stream was not explored at that time. It was one cold day in January when Kirk, Mark and myself decided to check it out. That outing did not last long. The woods were snow covered, and the stream was heavily iced over. So we left and planned to check it out during better conditions.

Well Tuesday I went to finally give the stream a good test. The walk this time was much more pleasant. The sky was cloudy with a sprinkle or two, air temps about 50. The stream had good flows and was full of the classic brook trout habitat. There were nice pools followed by series of riffles. Undercut banks along with downed trees provided adequate cover. So I cast the first fly and started my quest for wild trout.


I walked along this stream for quite some distance. I do not know the mileage but the time was two and a half to three hours. I cast dry and wet fly, and a streamer or two. In all that effort I never once took a hit.

A stream this nice cannot be devoid of trout. They must be there, perhaps I should have gone to the next bend, who knows.

It was a nice hike, and some very interesting looking caves were spotted. Perhaps at another time they can be explored.


In Connecticut we are fortunate to have many small streams, even some that get no fishing pressure at all. After my hike to stream X, I checked another stream close by. It's a beautiful little water that flows through some back breaking foliage. And to make a cast can be frustrating. But the rewards are there.


Several wild jewels were brought to hand on a "Black Fly".


I then moved to a third stream, this one also on public land. The waters of this brook have given brookies and once and awhile a nice brown. Working a soft hackle fly through some deep runs worked.




More and more wild flowers starting to show. With the rains of the last days it should bring many more.


As I walked downstream I came to a deep plunge, with a swift water flow through it. That has to have a fish in it. I tossed the black fly and let it swirl about. Sure enough a trout hit. After he felt steel he headed to the branch where he promptly deposited my hook in the submerged branch. Several tugs and the fly and branch were free. I false cast a time or two to let the fly dry. I tossed the fly in the water to see how it floated. Suddenly a trout came up and hit the fly, unfortunately he missed. Several more casts and no response. I tied on a soft hackle and sent it into the swift water. And what do you know a trout hit, and hit hard. The fish battled with a force not know on this stream. I knew he was a nice fish.


As the brook trout lie in the water I glanced down and could not believe his size. With camera ready I lifted him out of the water and snapped the memory forever. Removing the hook I held him in the water for a moment or two. Suddenly he kicked and was gone.


This is a fish I will not forget.


CLICK IMAGES TO ENLARGE

43 comments:

  1. Alan
    Stream X has got to have some trout lurking in it. Do you ever land any small perch in any of the streams you fish, perhaps this stream could be one of those. Do you need permission to fish on public lands there? I know here most of the land is leased by deer hunters and one has to have permission before they can hunt or fish on the property. Thanks for sharing

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Bill Trussell,
      Thanks.
      Bill I've never caught a perch in any of the streams, although I have taken sunfish, and a small pickerel once.
      Public lands are owned by the state and are used for many legal outdoor activities for all. These lands cannot be leased.

      Delete
  2. I have a feeling not much gets by that Monster in a small stream. Stream X looks pretty good, and It looks like it should hold trout. Thanks for sharing.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Savage,
      Thanks.
      Jonathan he had a somewhat slender body for the size of his head. This leads me to think he might not have gotten his fair share. I'd like to catch him again in the Fall just to see what he really looks like.

      Delete
  3. The last Brookie is a monster for that stream !!Fine Job Al!!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. TROUT1,
      Thanks.
      Pete he sure seemed out of place. But there have been a few nice sized browns taken in that stream in the past.

      Delete
  4. Nice one. I always think (whether true or not) that if a stream can hold a fish that big then it can hold a bigger one.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. ssj,
      Thanks.
      I will totally agree with you, it's very true.

      Delete
  5. A great outing Alan, looks like you caught the daddy of the stream, well done.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. brian,
      Thanks.
      If not the daddy Brian, he sure was big brother.

      Delete
  6. wow! great-looking fish! really love the subtle browns and light greens of this in-between season for you there!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. TexWisGirl,
      Thanks.
      The forest still holds those browns, but each day the beautiful colors appear.

      Delete
  7. Replies
    1. Michissippi,
      Thanks.
      I appreciate your comment.

      Delete
  8. Just goes to show that you never know what to expect in some of the small streams. That fish was probably a very pleasant surprise.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. TROUT1,
      Thanks.
      For sure Pete. I can't imagine how old he was. To get that big in that small stream is amazing.

      Delete
  9. Whoa...look at the mouth on that sucker! Nice going, Alan.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Ben B.
      Thanks.
      He had a very distinctive black mouth. It's just like the brookies I've caught in Maine.

      Delete
  10. Whoa, wicked brookie! Congrats!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Swamp Yankee,
      Thanks.
      I appreciate that buddy.

      Delete
  11. Alan - that is one nice brookie for sure! Do I see a little beadhead PT in it's mouth? Maybe all the ice we saw back in the winter on the first stream is the reason there were no fish to be found. Anyway a very nice outing for sure!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Mark,
      Thanks.
      It's actually a a soft hackle with a floss body and some UV threads tied in the head.
      That stream had lots of sand, shale bottom and not much small gravel.

      Delete
  12. Nice Alan - a day of many streams. That is an enormous brookie!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. LQN,
      Thanks.
      As it turned out. You never know.

      Delete
  13. Brk Trt,
    holy you know what!!! That brookie is some fish. Well done across the board............Phil

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. DRYFLYGUY,
      Thanks.
      Phil he was the fish of this early year so far.

      Delete
  14. Replies
    1. RM Lytle,
      Thanks.
      The ruler of a few pools in that stream.

      Delete
  15. That last brookie was a true trophy for such a stream. Outstanding job. As for the first stream.....even though you never brought a trout to hand, a walk along such a stream can be a reward in of itself.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Kiwi,
      Thanks.
      Chris your right. The hike into that stream was wonderful. It would be a great family trek some day.

      Delete
  16. Those brookies are just gorgeous.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Howard,
      Thanks.
      I can never tire of them. I'm a kid.

      Delete
  17. The "Rewards" of fishing in your area is incredible. If one beautiful looking stream, stream X, doesn't produce move on. Blue Line "Heaven". To the Masters of the game come the biggest rewards. One heck of a nice Brookie!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Mel(Pond Stalker)
      Thanks.
      Rewards are great indeed Mel, I like the term Blue Line "Heaven".

      Delete
  18. Alan...do you have an "absolute" favorite stream that you keep secret and unnamed? If so maybe you can do a photo blog on it...keeping it unnmamed of course. That would be an interesting read.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. tim,
      Thanks.
      I do have a favorite, actually 3, one in Connecticut, one in Pennsylvania, and one in Maine.
      Perhaps I'll do a post on them as you have suggested.

      Delete
  19. You caught "Grandpa!" That is one old native brookie.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Lester Kish,
      Thanks.
      My thoughts as well. One tough New Englander.

      Delete
  20. Holy smokes! Those first few fish were impressive in beauty but WOW that last was a remarkable. Thank you for sharing it with us and for sharing the grandeur in the streams you fish. Breath taking.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Atlas,
      Thanks.
      That last brook trout is one of my best small stream fish.

      Delete
  21. Welldone Alan , what a beauty particularly for a wee stream like that.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Col,
      Thanks.
      He was certainly a surprise.

      Delete