Thursday, February 12, 2015

Corned Venison

Corned venison
Being blessed with two deer this last December our little freezer in the garage was pretty full. We are a family who enjoys venison, and we have a few friends who also like it so it will be consumed. I'm always looking for a new preparation for this wild meat, and I have found just that. It's corning. I'm sure all of you have had corned beef, be it in a dinner with cabbage and potatoes, or perhaps thinly sliced on a crusty rye bread. Well this is the same only substituting venison for beef.

The preparation involves making a brine in which the venison will cure. The brine consists of spring water, sea salt, bay leaves, garlic cloves, mustard seed, peppercorns, and pink salt. The spices are placed in a pot and brought to the boil then allowed to cool completely. The raw venison is cleaned of silver skin and unwanted bits of fat. I usually use meat from the hind leg, but meat from other parts of the deer can be used. When the brine is cooled the deer is placed into a canister. A large stainless steel pot, a sturdy plastic container, or a crock. Make sure that the venison is completely covered with the brine. The vessel holding the meat should be placed into the refrigerator and allowed to cure, this will take about 7 days. Each day the venison should be turned so that it cures evenly.

At the end of 7 days the corned venison is taken out and placed into a pot of cold water. The water is brought to the boil then the heat reduced and allowed to simmer for 3 hours, at which time the vegetables are added and allowed to cook until tender.

When served like this one can not determine it is deer and not beef. The benefit is the natural goodness of lean deer and not fatty beef.


One of the best ways to enjoy corned venison is in a hash. This is my favorite.



24 comments:

  1. Replies
    1. John Wooldridge,
      Thanks.
      Healthy for you to John.

      Delete
  2. I guess I know what I'm trying this weekend! Looks awesome - thanks for sharing BrkTrt!!!
    Will

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hibernation,
      Thanks.
      Will you'll love it. I used a top round and a sirloin tip. It worked just great.

      Delete
  3. Replies
    1. Howard Levett,
      Thanks.
      I would say with certainty "No".....but still so good.

      Delete
  4. Corned venison and potatoes, I thought you were supposed to wait 'til St Patty's Day? Looks delicious and now I'm hungry!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Mark,
      Thanks.
      Maybe if we all cook some up at the same time maybe we'll warm up. A good brunch item for next New Years.

      Delete
  5. That is some good looking food!! The breakfast hash looks just amazing , I love a good hash with corned beef (deer).
    I'd be slicing some real thin , put it on rye bread with a slice of provolone and some kraut...Now I'm really ready for lunch!!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. HighPlainsFlyFisher,
      Thanks.
      Jeff that's one hell of a sandwich.

      Delete
  6. Alan
    As you know I am into eating healthy and this meal is the perfect fit. Any type of meat that is cured that long has got to be tasty. Great post, thanks for sharing

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Bill Trussell,
      Thanks.
      Bill is on the healthy side as far as fats are concerned. The only drawback is the salt used in the cure. Once and awhile it's OK though.

      Delete
  7. The day after St Patrick's Day I start looking forward to the next one so I can have Corned Beef and Cabbage again. With you showing us this Corned Venison and Cabbage, I'll never be the same.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Mark Kautz,
      Thanks.
      Ah it's an early St. Patrick's day. Have yourself some.

      Delete
  8. I can almost smell it! Looks amazing.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. RM Lytle,
      Thanks.
      Your right RM, the smell can be intoxicating, almost as good as the taste.

      Delete
  9. what a great idea..looks awesome!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. penbayman,
      Thanks.
      Mike it's another way to use deer......now for some wild boar bacon.

      Delete
  10. Looks awesome! Try smoking it next time and you have pastrami!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. RI brook trout,
      Thanks.
      Yes sir. I saw a recipe for that also. I need a smoker.

      Delete
  11. Thank you for this, I will be saving this post for future reference. I unfortunately didn't get a deer this year but already looking forward to next season. Thanks again and I hope to use it soon!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Atlas,
      Thanks.
      Bryan I can post you the link for the exact recipe when the time comes.

      Delete
  12. Indeed, your culinary genius seems pleasing to the taste buds!! I'll have to give your venison (version) a try!!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Drew LooknFishy,
      Thanks.
      It's sure to please.

      Delete